Magnus Carlsen Net Worth – Salary, Income and Assets, Exposed!

Are you looking for the net worth of Magnus Carlsen? If yes, you have come to the right place.

Let’s take a close look at Magnus Carlsen and how he became so rich today.

What is Magnus Carlsen’s Net Worth?

Summary of Magnus Carlsen’s Net Worth

  • Net Worth: $50 Million
  • Date of Birth: 1990-11-30
  • Gender: Male
  • Profession: Professional Chess Player, Model
  • Nationality: Norway

Magnus Carlsen has an estimated net worth of $50 million. He is a Norwegian international chess grandmaster who was crowned the sixteenth World Chess Champion. He became the world champion on November 28, 2013, at the age of 22 years, 11 months, and 23 days, making him the second-youngest champion in history after Garry Kasparov. 

He won the title by defeating champion Viswanathan Anand by 6½-3½ points (3 wins and 7 draws) in the match organized by FIDE in the Indian city of Chennai. He is considered one of the best players in the history of the sport.

Carlsen became a grandmaster at the age of 13. In 2010 he reached the first position in the world ranking of the International Chess Federation. 

He is the second-youngest player to surpass the 2,800 Elo points mark, surpassed by Alireza Firouzja in 2021, and the youngest player to become number one in the world rankings at the age of 19 years and one month. On the April 2014 list, Carlsen reached 2,882 Elo points for the first time, the highest number ever, surpassing Kasparov’s 2,851 points in July 1999.

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Magnus Carlsen’s Early Life

Carlsen was born on November 30, 1990, in Tønsberg, Norway, to Sigrun Øen, a chemical engineer, and Henrik Albert Carlsen, a consultant for IT.

In 1997, the family lived in Espoo, Finland, and then in Brussels, Belgium, before returning to Norway in 1998, where they lived in Lommedalen, Bergen. They later moved to Haslum. 

From a young age, Carlsen showed an aptitude for intellectual challenges. By the time he was two, he could solve 50-piece jigsaw puzzles, and by the time he was four, he was enjoying assembling Lego sets with instructions for children between the ages of 10and 14.

An avid amateur chess player, his father taught him the game at age 5, although he initially had no interest in it. His desire to beat his older sister at chess was one of the reasons that led him to play the game seriously in 2010.

Bent Larsen’s Find the Plan was Carlsen’s first chess book, and Eduard Gufeld’s The Complete Dragon was his first book on openings.

Carlsen’s early chess skills were developed by playing alone for hours, moving pieces back and forth, exploring combinations, and replaying games his father had shown him. 

Simen Agdestein points out that by the age of five, Carlsen was able to memorize the locations, populations, flags, and capitals of all the countries in the world. Then he memorized the places, populations, coats of arms, and administrative centers of “practically all” of Norway’s 356 municipalities.

Magnus Carlsen’s Chess Career

Carlsen lived in Lommedalen, near Norway’s capital, Oslo. At the age of eight, he played his first tournament as a Federated; he was trained at the Sports Gymnasium, which was run by Norway’s best player, Grandmaster Simen Agdestein. 

He achieved remarkable victories against players such as Nigel Short (former World Championship runner-up), Kramnik, Ivan Sokolov, Dolmatov, Ernst, and Karpov. He came to a draw against Kasparov.

Magnus received support in 2002 from the Norwegian computer company Arctic Securities and from Microsoft. The Danish grandmaster Peter Heine Nielsen trained him. In 2002 he was named runner-up in the under-12 category.

He first attracted international attention when he won Group C of the Corus Chess Tournament in January 2004 with 10.5 points out of a possible 13. Two years later, he won Group B of the same tournament. 

In June 2004, he participated in the 2004 World Chess Championship (FIDE) as the youngest player among 128 participants (elimination match system, from which the Uzbek Rustam Kasimdzhanov eventually emerged as the world champion ), although Carlsen was eliminated in the first round against Levon Aronian. In the 2005 Norwegian Chess Championship, Carlsen finished in a tie for first place, this time with his mentor Deél Simen Agdestein.

In the 2013 World Chess Championship, he defeated Viswanathan Anand 6½:3½ to win the world title. At the 2014 World Chess Championship, he defeated the returning Anand 6.5:4.5 to become the defending champion. At the 2016 World Chess Championship, he defeated Karjakin 3:1 to continue his title defense.

Carlsen won the World Championship in Ultra-Rapid Chess in 2009, 2014, and 2017, and he also participated in the World Rapid Chess Championship in 2014 and 2015. In 2014 Carlsen was even champion in classical, rapid, and ultra-rapid chess at the same time.

Carlsen was also the winner of the rapid chess championship organized by Chess.com in 2016 and 2017. Carlsen defeated Alexander Grischuk and Hikaru Nakamura in the semifinals and final respectively.

In the first round of the 2017 World Superfast Chess Championship, when Carlsen played Ernesto Inarkiev, Inarkiev illegally played Carlsen’s knight on the condition of being checkmated. 

The latter intuitively moved the king out of danger, but Inarkiev suddenly pointed out to the arbiter that Carlsen had broken the rules. The arbiter initially awarded Inarkiev the victory, but after a while, the verdict went from the situation of general Carlsen. In the game Inarkiev refused, and Carlsen won.

In 2018 Tata Steel Carlsen shared first place with Anish Giri on 9 points, and Carlsen won the rapid chess format of the tiebreaker 1:1, beating Giri.

Carlsen leads the 2018 Uga Gasimov Memorial Tournament with a record of +3-0=6. This tournament is an important victory for Carlsen in this year’s classical chess tournament due to the presence of strong opponents.

In November 2018, Carlsen defeated Fabiano Caruana to win the 2018 World Chess Championship. This time, the rules of the World Chess Championship state that the winner is the one who first reaches 6.5 points.

If the score is still tied after 12 games, an additional game will be held to determine the champion. In the additional rounds, 4 rounds of rapid chess of 25 minutes each are played first. If the score is still tied, the game continues with 5 rounds of 5-minute rapid chess.

If it is still a draw, the winner is determined by the Armageddon system. The match consisted of 12 bitter draws, which was 4 more than the previous world record of 8 opening draws, set by Kasparov and Viswanathan Anand in 1995.

Apart from the hardships that top chess players can cause under the influence of modern chess styles and computer operations, Carlsen has an advantage in additional games. A 3-0 win over Fabiano Caruana in rapid chess destroyed his chances of becoming the second American world champion after Fischer and gave Carlsen another title defense.

After drawing the first five games, Carlsen defeated challenger Ian Nepomniachtchi in Game 6 of the 2021 World Chess Championship. In addition to being the first decisive World Chess Championship game in more than 5 years, it was also the longest game in the series’ history at 136 moves. 

Furthermore, Carlsen defeated Nepomniachtchi in Games 8, 9, and 11, retaining his title. Following the match, Carlsen said, “I don’t expect to play the next world championship match unless Firouzja wins the Candidates Tournament.”

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Magnus Carlsen’s Playing Style

As a teenager, he was known for his offensive style. According to Simen Agdestein, he was distinguished at the time by “a reckless willingness to offer material for activities.”

As he matured, Carlsen changed his style and adapted more to the solid style of elite chess, where most games end in a draw. Since then he has never had a problem gaining an advantage after the opening and asserting his virtuosity in the middlegame and endgame from seemingly equal positions.

To progress, Carlsen developed a more versatile and universal style. He is able to use openings with 1.d4, 1.e4, more recently 1.c4, and occasionally 1.Nf3. This versatility, characteristic of many elite players, should make it more difficult for opponents to prepare in openings, as there is more ground to cover.

He also quickly deviates from the most familiar paths of theory on many occasions to avoid possible laboratory preparations by his rivals against him, and even to greatly reduce the effect of module analysis. He has mentioned that the middlegame is his favorite part of the game, as it is “pure chess”.

Garry Kasparov, who coached Carlsen from 2009 to 2010, explained that his positional style resembled that of former world champions such as Anatoly Kárpov, José Raúl Capablanca, and Vasily Smyslov, in contrast to the tactical style of Alexander Alekhine, Mikhail Tal and Kasparov himself.

As of 2018, his study of the games of the AlphaZero artificial intelligence program marks a drastic change in his style, which has become more offensive and less concerned with giving up pawns in exchange for the initiative.

After his victory in defense of his world title against Fabiano Caruana in 2018, his style has become more dynamic and he has managed to revive elite openings that had almost been forgotten, such as the Pelican Variation of the Sicilian Defense or the London System.

Magnus Carlsen Business Venture

Because of his fame as a chess star, Carlsen has entered into many business partnerships with well-known brands. In 2010 and 2014, he modeled for the Dutch designer clothing company G-Star RAW. Carlsen is not only an ambassador for Nordic Semiconductor but has also represented the gambling company Unibet.

Together with Anders Brandt and Espen Adgestein, Carlsen founded the company Play Magnus AS.

Play Magnus’ first product was an iOS app based on a database of Carlsen’s previous games. Later, other apps were released, including Magnus Trainer and the Magnus Kingdom of Chess. Carlsen founded the Offerspill Chess Club in Norway in 2019, of which he is also chairman.

Play Magnus and chess24.com merged in March 2019, creating one of the largest online chess portals in the world with an estimated private market value of over $100 million.

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Magnus Carlsen’s Salary

Magnus Carlsen is rich, so you can assume that his salary is higher than that of an average person.

But he has not publicly disclosed his salary for privacy reasons. Therefore, we cannot give an accurate estimate of his salary.

Magnus Carlsen’s Income

Magnus Carlsen might have many sources of income such as investments, business and salary. His income fluctuates every year and depends on many economic factors.

We have tried to research, but we cannot find any verified information about his income.

Magnus Carlsen’s Assets

Given Magnus Carlsen’s estimated net worth, he should own some houses, cars, and stocks, but Magnus Carlsen has not publicly disclosed all of his assets. So we cannot get an accurate figure on his assets.

Magnus Carlsen Quotes

Some people think that if their opponent plays a beautiful game, it’s okay to lose. I don’t. You have to be merciless.

 

If you want to get to the top, there’s always the risk that it will isolate you from other people.

 

Once you’re a chess player, you spend a lot of time thinking about the game and you can’t get it completely out of your head.

 

I spend hours playing chess because I find it so much fun. The day it stops being fun is the day I give up.

 

Maybe if I didn’t have the talent in chess I’d find the talent in something else. The only thing I know is that I have talent in chess, and I’m satisfied with that.

 

I get more upset at losing at other things than chess. I always get upset when I lose at Monopoly.

 

One of the things that first attracted me to chess is that it brings you into contact with intelligent, civilized people – men of the stature of Garry Kasparov, the former world champion, who was my part-time coach.

 

I got the travel bug when I was quite young. My parents took me and my sisters out of school and we travelled all over Europe. It was an eye-opening experience and, although I love Norway, I also enjoy visiting new countries. I don’t get homesick.

 

I don’t look at computers as opponents. For me it is much more interesting to beat humans.

View our larger collection of the best Magnus Carlsen quotes.

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How To Become Rich Like Magnus Carlsen?

Magnus Carlsen did not become rich by luck. To become as rich as Magnus Carlsen, you have to work smart.

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Thanks to the Internet, the world has changed massively in recent years. Nowadays it has become much easier to make money online.

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If you seize this golden opportunity in time, you can become as successful as Magnus Carlsen one day.

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