Jerry Lawson Net Worth at Death – Salary, Income, Earnings

Jerry Lawson Net Worth

Jerry Lawson had an estimated net worth of $2 Million at death. He brought interchangeable video games into people’s homes with the invention of the Fairchild Channel F, the precursor to modern video game systems. The majority of his income came from his career as an Electronic engineer.

In the 1970s, Jerry Lawson helped create the Fairchild Channel F, the first home video game system with interchangeable games. Lawson, a native of New York, was one of the few African American engineers working in computing at the dawn of the video game era.

To calculate the net worth of Jerry Lawson, subtract all his liabilities from his total assets. Investments, savings, cash deposits, and any equity he has in a house, car, or other similar asset are included in the total assets. All debts, such as loans and personal debt, are included in total liabilities.

Here’s the breakdown of his net worth:

Name: Jerry Lawson
Net Worth: $2 Million
Monthly Salary: $20 Thousand
Annual Income: $400 Thousand
Source of Wealth: Electronic engineer

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Early Life and Education

Gerald Anderson Lawson, born on December 1, 1940 in New York City, is a video game pioneer who helped develop the first cartridge-based home video game console system. Lawson’s father was a longshoreman, and his mother worked for the city of New York. Michael was his only sibling.

Lawson was inspired by George Washington Carver’s work as a child and dabbled in electronics as a child, repairing televisions to make a little money before enrolling at Queens College, part of the City University of New York.

His interest in computing led him to the Homebrew Computer Club in Silicon Valley in the 1970s, where he was the only Black member at the time. During his time with the club, he met Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak. (In an interview, he described Jobs as a business-minded “sparkplug” and stated that he was unimpressed when he interviewed Wozniak for a job.)

Video Game Pioneer

Lawson assisted in the development of the Fairchild Channel F, a home entertainment machine released in 1976 by Fairchild Semiconductor, where he worked as director of engineering and marketing. (Mike Markkula, co-founder of Apple Computers Inc., had previously led the company’s marketing.)

Though simple by today’s standards, Lawson’s work enabled people to play a variety of games in the comfort of their own homes, paving the way for systems such as the Atatri 2600, Nintendo, Xbox, and Playstation.

Lawson, one of the few Black engineers in his industry, later stated that colleagues were frequently surprised to learn that he was African American: “It’s become a problem for some people. People have looked at me in complete disbelief. Especially if they hear my voice, because they believe that all Black people have a certain voice that they recognize. And I’m sitting there thinking, ‘Oh yeah? Sorry, but I don’t.'”

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Death

Lawson died on April 9, 2011, in Mountain View, California, of diabetes complications. His wife, Catherine, and two children survived him.

Further Reading

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