Best James Patterson Quotes I Wish I Had Read

Are you looking for James Patterson quotes? If yes, you have come to the right place.

Born on March 22, 1947, in Newburgh, New York, James Patterson is a prolific author who has written detective stories, thrillers, science fiction, romance and young adult novels. His first book was published in 1976; 20 years later he left his advertising career to focus on writing. Patterson holds the Guinness World Record for having the most books on The New York Times’ best-seller list.

We have compiled a list of James Patterson quotes for you to read.

Enjoy!

James Patterson Quotes

Life is hard, and a lot of people come home tired from work. If they’re gonna spend half an hour reading, they want some entertainment and a sense of achievement. So that’s what I give them. That’s all I’m trying to do. Is that really so wrong?

 

People like to talk more than they like to act. They like to sit there and complain and vent. Somehow they think that changes things, when it doesn’t.

 

Somebody said the key to life is to work hard, play hard, rest hard, and I’ve pretty much adopted that.

 

Every once in a while, I’ll have a ‘Do you know who I am?’ moment, at least in my head. I hate that.

 

There are reasons people seek escape in books, and one of those reasons is that the boundary of what can happen is beyond what we do – or would want to see in real life.

 

Commercial books don’t even get covered. The reason why so many book reviews go out of business is because they cover a lot of stuff that nobody cares about. Imagine if the movie pages covered none of the big movies and all they covered were movies that you couldn’t even find in the theater?

 

Always expect the unexpected. Right around Thanksgiving, when the new Alex Cross will be out. It’s called Four Blind Mice and it’s a pretty amazing story about several murders inside the military.

 

A lot of people like the idea of eternal love and eternal romance. The notion of love that is more profound and deeper because it is eternal is very powerful.

 

Generally I find that kids ask better questions than you get with adults. Something that kids will do a lot is, they’re so nervous, and they’re not really paying attention, so they’ll ask the same question someone just asked. And you’re trying to be nice and not embarrass them any more than they are already.

 

I always figured there would be a kid audience and an adult audience, and there is. That’s true for ‘Hunger Games’ and ‘Twilight’ and ‘Harry Potter.’ And ‘Maximum Ride,’ for sure. In particular what happens is a lot of parents share the books with their kids, and the mom has read it, and the kids, and they talk about it.

 

People always come up to me and say, ‘you should do standup.’ It’s nice to discover things about yourself. That keeps everything lively and fun.

 

The best way to get kids reading more is to give them books that they’ll gobble up – and that will make them ask for another.

 

I’m not a writer’s writer. I’m not a craftsman. I could be, and that would be a one-book-a-year operation.

 

 

I believe we should spend less time worrying about the quantity of books children read and more time introducing them to quality books that will turn them on to the joy of reading and turn them into lifelong readers.

 

One of the nice things about books as opposed to television and movies to some extent is it’s not a passive entertainment. People really do get involved, and they do create, and they do have their own visions of what different characters look like and what should happen. It’s great – it means their brains are working.

 

The vampire underworld is much larger than most people could imagine. It exists in all the cities mentioned in the book, but also in many, many more. Teenagers, especially, seem to like to act out vampire fantasies.

 

In my office in Florida I have, I think, 30 manuscript piles around the room. Some are screenplays or comic books or graphic novels. Some are almost done. Some I’m rewriting. If I’m working with a co-writer, they’ll usually write the first draft. And then I write subsequent drafts.

 

I grew up in a house full of women: my mother, grandmother, three sisters, and two female cats. And I still have the buzz of their conversations in my head. As an adult, I have more female friends than male ones: I just love the way that women talk.

 

This summer, I’ll be bringing out a mystery that involves a young lawyer and a court scene the likes of which I don’t think you’ve ever seen. Hollywood said this is James Patterson meets John Grisham.

 

I was always a good student, but I didn’t read that much until I was 18 and I was working my way through college.

 

I read some, and then visited with people involved in this curious, exciting and somewhat misunderstood sub-culture. I met with a fang maker, who offered to fit me for an exquisite pair.

 

I never read detective novels. I started out in graduate school writing a more serious book. Right around that time I read ‘The Day of the Jackal’ and ‘The Exorcist’. I hadn’t read a lot of commercial fiction, and I liked them.

 

I did know that the book would end with a mind-boggling trial, but I didn’t know exactly how it would turn out. I like a little suspense when I am writing, too.

 

For many years I had heard about an underworld consisting of people who act out a vampire fantasy while I was living in New York. Fortunately for me there are also several books on the phenomena.

 

It seemed to me that I could write commercial fiction. I wasn’t sure whether I could, or whether I wanted to write serious fiction at that point. So I said, ‘Let me try something else,’ and I wrote a mystery – but I didn’t know much about it.

 

I love to tell stories. It’s a delight for me.

 

I have a number of writers I work with regularly. I write an outline for a book. The outlines are very specific about what each scene is supposed to accomplish.

 

I don’t get a chance to be funny with the thrillers. I like to be funny, and I think I am really funny. So with ‘Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life’, it was fun to let loose.

 

I didn’t care for most of the books I was being asked to read in school. I started reading like crazy right after high school when I got a job in a mental hospital. I was working my way through college, and I did a lot of night shifts, and there was nothing to do. So I read like crazy, serious stuff, all the classics.

 

It’s our job – as parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles – to find books our kids are going to like.

 

If I’m writing and a chapter isn’t coming, I just move ahead.

 

When I was 26, I wrote my first mystery, ‘The Thomas Berryman Number’, and it was turned down by, I don’t know, 31 publishers. Then it won an Edgar for Best First Novel. Go figure.

 

My favorite books are actually very complicated – ‘One Hundred Years of Solitude’, ‘Ulysses’.

 

I’m a very good storyteller; I have a lot of compassion for people. That’s very useful for a novelist. A lot of novelists are snots. They’re just mean people. I’m not a terribly skilled stylist, nor do I want to be. I want a lot of people to read one of my stories and go, ‘That was pretty cool.’

 

A good love story always keeps the pot boiling.

 

I get up every morning and chop wood, and I pretty much do it seven days a week, and I like to do it. I still have time for my wife and my son, who’s 14, and at this point, my head is still above water.

 

Hollywood is a peculiar beast – people in Hollywood are nuts.

 

I have a folder in my office with about 400 ideas in it. So it will take me another 40 years to get through those.

 

There are a lot of things we as individuals can’t do much about. We can’t solve global warming as individuals, or health care problems, but as individuals, most of us can get our kids reading. We can do that.

 

Ultimately, a great thriller is a roller coaster ride. I like to think that’s a promise I have never failed to keep, and one that I’d say has served my books well.

 

A lot of writers fall in love with their sentences or their construction of sentences, and sometimes that’s great, but not everybody is Gabriel Garcia Marquez or James Joyce. A lot of people like to pretend that they are, and they wind up not giving people a good read or enlightening them.

 

I’m very conscious that I’m an entertainer. Something like 73 percent of my readers are college graduates, so you can’t condescend to people. You’ve got to tell them a story that they will be willing to pay money to read.

 

My style is colloquial storytelling. It’s the way we tell stories to one another – it’s not writerly, it’s not overdone.

 

I’m big on having a blistering pace. That’s one of the hallmarks of what I do, and that’s not easy. I never blow up cars and things like that, so it’s something else that keeps the suspense flowing. I try not to write a chapter that isn’t going to turn on the movie projector in your head.

 

You know, I remember watching Morgan Freeman when he did the two Alex Cross movies, and he’s so confident that he’s going to knock the scene dead. And I’m really confident that I can tell a good story now, so I just don’t worry about things.

 

I think e-books are terrific in their own right. I love being able to get on a plane and basically carry around seven books and it weigh 10 ounces.

 

What I’m really addicted to is getting people to understand that if their kids aren’t competent readers coming out of middle school, it’s really going to be hard for them in high school.

 

Kids don’t read as much as you’d like them to, just in terms of seeing the world from different perspectives. I mean, that’s the great thing about books, still. Here’s television, here are the movies, and it’s pretty limited in terms of the perspectives.

 

The subject for a lot of non-fiction is very emotional, but if you read it, it’s the most boring, dry stuff. I wanted ‘Torn Apart’ to be extremely accessible and readable.

 

I don’t think of myself as a writer.

 

I don’t smile as much as I should, even though I smile inside a lot.

 

A lot of times you get people writing wonderful sentences and paragraphs, and they fall in love with their prose style, but the stories really aren’t that terrific.

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