J. Robert Oppenheimer Net Worth at Death – Salary, Income, Earnings

J. Robert Oppenheimer Net Worth

Robert Oppenheimer had an estimated net worth of $2 million at death. J. Robert Oppenheimer is often called the “father of the atomic bomb” for leading the Manhattan Project, the program that developed the first nuclear weapon during World War II. He earned most of his income from his research on the atomic bomb. 

During the development of the atomic bomb, physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer was the director of the Los Alamos Laboratory. Following Nazi Germany’s invasion of Poland in 1939, Oppenheimer was chosen to run a laboratory for the Manhattan Project, which developed the first nuclear weapon during World War II.

After resigning in 1945, he became chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission’s General Advisory Committee. Prior to his death in 1963, President John F. Kennedy announced that Oppenheimer would receive the Enrico Fermi Award for his contributions to physics.

President Lyndon B. Johnson presented him with the award in December of that year. In 1967, at the age of 62, the “Father of the Atomic Bomb” died of cancer in Princeton, New Jersey.

To calculate the net worth of J. Robert Oppenheimer, subtract all his liabilities from his total assets. Investments, savings, cash deposits, and any equity he has in a house, car, or other similar asset are included in the total assets.

All debts, such as personal loans and mortgages, are included in total liabilities. 

Here’s the breakdown of his net worth:

Name: J. Robert Oppenheimer
Net Worth: $3 Million
Monthly Salary: $30 Thousand
Annual Income: $500 Thousand
Source of Wealth: Scientist, Researcher

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Early Life and Education

Oppenheimer was born in New York City on April 22, 1904, to German Jewish immigrants. Oppenheimer sailed to England after graduating from Harvard University and enrolled at the University of Cambridge, where he began his atomic research at the Cavendish Laboratory in 1925.

A year later, he collaborated with Max Born at Göttingen University, where he met a slew of notable physicists, including Niels Bohr. He earned his doctorate at Göttingen while also developing the “Born-Oppenheimer method,” which made an important contribution to quantum molecular theory.

The Manhattan Project

In the 1930s, Oppenheimer became politically active, agreeing with Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard that the Nazis could develop a nuclear weapon.

Following Nazi Germany’s invasion of Poland in 1939, Oppenheimer was chosen to run a laboratory for the Manhattan Project, a US Army experiment aimed at harnessing atomic energy for military purposes. Beginning in 1942, he oversaw the scientific end of the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, New Mexico.

The project was staffed by many scientists who had fled fascist regimes in Europe, and their mission was to investigate a newly documented fission process involving uranium-235, with the goal of developing a nuclear bomb before Adolf Hitler could.

The US government initially allocated $6,000 to the project, but by the time it was completed in 1945, the budget had grown to $2 billion. The first test of the bomb occurred that year, and due to its success, two more bombs were deployed the following month: one in Nagasaki, Japan, and the other in Hiroshima, Japan. These actions effectively ended World War II.

However, after witnessing the bomb’s devastation, Oppenheimer argued against its further development and resigned from his post the following year.

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Life After WWII

Oppenheimer went on to become chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission’s General Advisory Committee, which opposed the development of the hydrogen bomb in October 1949. Because of this shocking opposition, Oppenheimer was accused of being a Communist sympathizer.

As a result, the Atomic Energy Commission suspended him from secret nuclear research and stripped him of his security clearance in 1953. President John F. Kennedy announced in 1963 that Oppenheimer would receive the Enrico Fermi Award. President Lyndon B. Johnson presented the award to Kennedy in December of that year, following his assassination.

Death

Oppenheimer continued to support international control of atomic energy in his later years. He died of throat cancer on February 18, 1967, in Princeton, New Jersey. Today, he is often called the “father of the atomic bomb.”

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J. Robert Oppenheimer Quotes

Now I am become death, the destroyer of worlds. (quoting the Bhagavad-Gita after witnessing the first Nuclear explosion.)

 

No man should escape our universities without knowing how little he knows.

 

There must be no barriers for freedom of inquiry… There is no place for dogma in science. The scientist is free, and must be free to ask any question, to doubt any assertion, to seek for any evidence, to correct any errors.

 

We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried, most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-Gita; Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and, to impress him, takes on his multi-armed form and says, “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.” I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.

 

There are no secrets about the world of nature. There are secrets about the thoughts and intentions of men.

 

It is perfectly obvious that the whole world is going to hell. The only possible chance that it might not is that we do not attempt to prevent it from doing so.

View our larger collection of the best J. Robert Oppenheimer quotes. 

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