10 Iconic USA Landmarks

1. GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 

Named for the mile-long strait at the mouth of San Francisco Bay that it crosses, this suspension bridge is known around the world for its graceful towers and rusty orange color. (It was originally intended to be blue and yellow, but the color of the primer stuck.) 

2. MOUNT RUSHMORE 

South Dakota’s Black Hills would be famous without it, but this colossal sculpture of four presidents—Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and, slightly behind the other three, Theodore Roosevelt—makes them iconic. By artist Gutzon Borglum, Mount Rushmore’s design changed several times before debuting in 1941. 

3. LOVE SCULPTURE 

It’s amazing that in a city full of unforgettable sights—the Liberty Bell, anyone?— that the best-loved symbol of Philadelphia is Robert Indiana’s red sculpture called “LOVE.” It was briefly removed two years after it was installed in 1976, but the out-cry from the citizenry brought it back to the City of Brotherly (and Sisterly) Love for good.  

4. STATUE OF LIBERTY 

People throw the word “iconic” around a lot these days, but New York’s Statue of Liberty is perhaps the one landmark that truly represents the United States in the eyes of the world. You can visit the island, but the best way to enjoy the statue is standing on the deck of the (free) Staten Island Ferry. 

5. SPACE NEEDLE 

Built for the World’s Fair in 1962, Seattle’s 604-foot Space Needle is an unforgettable part of the Seattle skyline. The futuristic design was a compromise be- tween two powerful men, one who wanted it to look like a balloon, the other like a flying saucer. 

6. EDMUND PETTUS BRIDGE 

The most potent symbol of America’s civil rights struggle is this bridge outside of Selma, Alabama. In 1965, state troopers brutally attacked 400 mostly African American demonstrators peacefully marching to Montgomery.

7. MIAMI BEACH 

More than 800 historic buildings in Miami Beach’s Art Deco District make up the world’s biggest collection of 1920s and 1930s resort architecture. (Our favorite? The baby-blue, neon-lit Colony Hotel on Ocean Drive.) 

8. WASHINGTON MONUMENT 

The world is full of similarly shaped obelisks, but something about the 1884 Washington Monument—maybe its location on top of a small hill, or the ring of flags surrounding its base—inspires us. It’s Washington, D.C.’s compass: east is the Capitol, north is the White House, and west is the Lincoln Memorial. 

9. GATEWAY ARCH 

The nation’s tallest monument, the 630-foot St. Louis Gateway Arch treats you to sweeping views of the Mississippi River. (A futuristic tram whisks you to the top.) Don’t miss the museum, which strives to weave in the stories of Native American people who lived in the region. 

10. HOLLYWOOD SIGN 

Fun fact: these 50-foot letters didn’t originally spell “Hollywood.” They advertised“Hollywoodland,” an upscale real estate development. When they fell into disrepair, the city of Los Angeles came to its rescue with a new coat of paint, removing the last four letters in the process. 

Leave a Comment

COVID-19 Took My Waiter Job, Then I Made 5-Figures From Home...Discover How I Did It!