114 Best Entrepreneurship Books to Read

Are you looking for the best Entrepreneurship books to read? If yes, you have come to the right place.

At High Income Source, we identify and review the best books in the world, based on recommendations by thought leaders and experts.

Below is a book list of the Entrepreneurship books you should read.

1. Be Fearless by Jean Case

Weaving together storytelling, practical tips and inspiration, the book will teach you how to put the five fearless principles to work so that you too can spark the sorts of remarkable breakthroughs that can impact the world. Philanthropist, investor, and technology pioneer Jean Case brings to life the five Be Fearless principles common to the people and organizations that bring about transformational change.

When National Geographic Chairman Jean Case set out to investigate the core qualities of great change makers, past and present, from inventors to revolutionaries, she found five surprising traits they all had in common. These weren’t wealth, privilege, or even genius. What all of these exceptional men and women shared was that they had chosen to make a “big bet,” take bold risks, learn from their failures, reach beyond their bubbles, and let urgency conquer fear.

Throughout Be Fearless, Jean vividly illustrates these principles through storytelling—from her own transformational life experiences, to Jane Goodall’s remarkable breakthroughs in understanding and protecting chimpanzees, to celebrity chef José Andrés’ decision to be a “first responder” and take his kitchen to the sites of devastating hurricanes to feed the hungry, to Madame C.J. Walker’s vision to build a hair care empire that would employ thousands across the country, and more. She shares new insights to stories you might think you know—like Airbnb’s tale of starting from scratch to transform the hospitality industry, to John F. Kennedy’s history-making moonshot—and gems from changemakers you’ve never heard of. Be Fearless features a compelling foreword from Jane Goodall saying “there is no time in history when it has been more important to Be Fearless” and a new afterword with stories of people inspired to take action after reading the book.

2. Be Obsessed or Be Average by Grant Cardone

Before Grant Cardone built five successful companies (and counting), became a multimillionaire, and wrote bestselling books… he was broke, jobless, and drug-addicted.

Grant had grown up with big dreams, but friends and family told him to be more reasonable and less demanding. If he played by the  rules, they said, he could enjoy everyone else’s version of middle class success. But when he tried it their way, he hit rock bottom.

Then he tried the opposite approach. He said NO to the haters and naysayers and said YES to his burning, outrageous, animal obsession. He reclaimed his obsession with wanting to be a business rock star, a super salesman, a huge philanthropist. He wanted to live in a mansion and even own an airplane. 

Obsession made all of his wildest dreams come true. And it can help you achieve massive success too. As Grant says, we’re in the middle of an epidemic of average. The conventional wisdom is to seek balance and take it easy. But that has really just given us an excuse to be unexceptional. 

If you want real success, you have to know how to harness your obsession to rocket to the top. This book will give you the inspiration and tools to break out of your cocoon of mediocrity and achieve your craziest dreams. Grant will teach you how to:

  • Set crazy goals—and reach them, every single day.
  • Feed the beast: when you value money and spend it on the right things, you get more of it.
  • Shut down the doubters—and use your haters as fuel.

Whether you’re a sales person, small business owner, or 9-to-5 working stiff, your path to happiness runs though your obsessions. It’s a simple choice: be obsessed or be average.

3. Behind the Cloud by Marc R. Benioff

How did salesforce.com grow from a start up in a rented apartment into the world’s fastest growing software company in less than a decade? For the first time, Marc Benioff, the visionary founder, chairman and CEO of salesforce.com, tells how he and his team created and used new business, technology, and philanthropic models tailored to this time of extraordinary change. 

Showing how salesforce.com not only survived the dotcom implosion of 2001, but went on to define itself as the leader of the cloud computing revolution and spark a $46-billion dollar industry, Benioff’s story will help business leaders and entrepreneurs stand out, innovate better, and grow faster in any economic climate.

In Behind the Cloud, Benioff shares the strategies that have inspired employees, turned customers into evangelists, leveraged an ecosystem of partners, and allowed innovation to flourish.

4. Being Boss by Kathleen Shannon

From the creators of the hit podcast comes an interactive self-help guide for creative entrepreneurs, where they share their best tools and tactics on “being boss” in both business and life.

Kathleen Shannon and Emily Thompson are self-proclaimed “business besties” and hosts of the top-ranked podcast Being Boss, where they talk shop and share their combined expertise with other creative entrepreneurs. 

Now they take the best of their from-the- trenches advice, giving you targeted guidance on:  

  • The Boss Mindset: how to weed out distractions, cultivate confidence, and tackle “fraudy feelings” 
  • Boss Habits: including a tested method for visually mapping out goals with magical results  
  • Boss Money: how to stop freaking out about finances and sell yourself (without shame)  

With worksheets, checklists, and other real tools for achieving success, here’s a guide that will truly help you “be boss” not only at growing your business, but creating a life you love.

5. Accounting Made Simple by Mike Piper

Find all of the following explained in Plain-English with no technical jargon:

  • The Accounting Equation and why it’s so significant
  • How to read and prepare financial statements
  • How to calculate and interpret several different financial ratios
  • The concepts and assumptions behind Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP)
  • Preparing journal entries with debits and credits
  • Cash method vs. accrual method
  • Inventory and Cost of Goods Sold
  • How to calculate depreciation and amortization expenses

6. Anything You Want by Derek Sivers

You can follow the beaten path and call yourself an entrepreneur or you can blaze your own trail and really be one.

When Derek Sivers started CD Baby, he wasn’t planning on building a major business. He was a successful independent musician who just wanted to sell his CDs online. When no one would help him do it, he set out on his own and built an online store from scratch.

He started in 1998 by helping his friends sell their CDs. In 2000, he hired his first employee. Eight years later, he sold CD Baby for $22 million.

Sivers didn’t need a business plan, and neither do you. You don’t need to think big; in fact, it’s better if you don’t. Start with what you have, care about your customers more than yourself, and run your business like you don’t need the money.

7. Arise, Awake by Rashmi Bansal

The book, ‘Arise, Awake: The Inspiring Stories of 10 Young Entrepreneurs Who Graduated from College into a Business of Their Own’ is an inspirational book that reveals the success stories of 10 youngsters who instead of taking up a job opted for entrepreneurship and achieved success. This book not only peeps in their lives but also demonstrates various skills that are required for achieving success on the business front. It has been written by Rashmi Bansal in an engaging tone and published by Westland Books.

Only a few have the strength to defy conventions and start something of their own in this frantic corporate world of today. 

This book shares stories of individuals who took visionary decisions which led them on their path to create successful ventures. It includes stories of ‘InOpen Technologies’ that was established by Rupesh Shah. 

A graduate from IET Alwar, Rupesh showed immense faith in open source technologies and designed a product that increases efficiency of teaching methods. 

Aruj Garg started the food chain, ‘Bhukkad’ which focuses on fast food which is natural and healthier. A CA final student, Apurva Joshi learnt the potential of fraud risk assessment during her internship at IndiaForensic and decided to tap this potential by creating her own agency FraudExpress. Eshwar Vikas and Sudeep Sabat were students at SRM Engineering College in Chennai when they realized the untapped market of dosa machine, which is why they founded ‘Dosamatic’. Anurag Arora established Ganpati Facilities during his stay at ICFAI Business School in Pune. He was fed up by the horrible facilities provided by their hostel and decided to create his own hostel and thus Ganpati Facilities was born. This book includes other such inspiring tales which will satiate your senses if you’re excited by the idea of entrepreneurship.

8. Ask by Ryan Levesque

The book, ‘Arise, Awake: The Inspiring Stories of 10 Young Entrepreneurs Who Graduated from College into a Business of Their Own’ is an inspirational book that reveals the success stories of 10 youngsters who instead of taking up a job opted for entrepreneurship and achieved success. This book not only peeps in their lives but also demonstrates various skills that are required for achieving success on the business front. It has been written by Rashmi Bansal in an engaging tone and published by Westland Books.

Only a few have the strength to defy conventions and start something of their own in this frantic corporate world of today. This book shares stories of individuals who took visionary decisions which led them on their path to create successful ventures. It includes stories of ‘InOpen Technologies’ that was established by Rupesh Shah. A graduate from IET Alwar, Rupesh showed immense faith in open source technologies and designed a product that increases efficiency of teaching methods.

Aruj Garg started the food chain, ‘Bhukkad’ which focuses on fast food which is natural and healthier. A CA final student, Apurva Joshi learnt the potential of fraud risk assessment during her internship at IndiaForensic and decided to tap this potential by creating her own agency FraudExpress. Eshwar Vikas and Sudeep Sabat were students at SRM Engineering College in Chennai when they realized the untapped market of dosa machine, which is why they founded ‘Dosamatic’. Anurag Arora established Ganpati Facilities during his stay at ICFAI Business School in Pune. He was fed up by the horrible facilities provided by their hostel and decided to create his own hostel and thus Ganpati Facilities was born. This book includes other such inspiring tales which will satiate your senses if you’re excited by the idea of entrepreneurship.

9. Be A Free Range Human by Marianne Cantwell

Trapped in a job or business that’s “just not you”? Always dreaming of your next vacation or living for the weekend? Marianne Cantwell’s straight-talking bestseller will help you break out of that career cage and Be A Free Range Human. It’s about much more than just quitting your job and becoming your own boss. It’s about life on your terms, working when, where and how you want – so you don’t have to fit yourself into someone else’s box to make a great income. This second edition won’t just inspire you, it will give you unconventional and practical steps to:

  • Discover what you really want to do with your life (even if no answer has ever fully fit)
  • Get started in 90 days, with what you have
  • Create a free range career, tailor-made for you and the life you want (be it travelling the world or hanging out in your favourite café)
  • Stand out from the crowd and get paid well to be you

Be A Free Range Human was one of the first and most popular guides to creating a custom career (without an office or a boss). Updated with new advice on how to make free range work for your personality (you don’t need to be a constantly-networking extrovert. have an MBA, or get funding), this smart, energizing guide will help you cut through the noise, see your options in a new way, and get the freedom and fulfilment you crave.

10. 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management by Kevin Kruse

What if a few new habits could dramatically increase your productivity, and even 5x or 10x it in key areas? What if you could get an an hour a day to read, exercise, or to spend with your family.

New York Times bestselling author, Kevin Kruse, presents the remarkable findings of his study of ultra-productive people. Based on survey research and interviews with billionaires, Olympic athletes, straight-A students, and over 200 entrepreneurs—-including Mark Cuban, Kevin Harrington, James Altucher, John Lee Dumas, Pat Flynn, Grant Cardone, and Lewis Howes—-Kruse answers the question: what are the secrets to extreme productivity?

In this book, you’ll learn:

  • Why millionaires don’t use to-do lists (and what they DO use)
  • How to cure procrastination with the “Time Travel” trick
  • How the Harvard “DDR Questions” save 8 hours a week
  • How to identify your REAL priorities
  • How to get to zero emails in your inbox using 321Zero
  • How the simple E-3C system will double your productivity
  • How to reduce stress with the Richard Branson Tool
  • How to leave work at 5:00 without feeling guilty
  • How to run meetings like Apple, Google & Virgin
  • How to conquer social media distractions
  • BONUS: QUIZ – Discover Your Time Personality
  • BONUS: 100+ Time Management Quotes

11. 21 Days to a Big Idea by Bryan Mattimore

From Bryan Mattimore, innovation guru to Fortune 500 companies, comes a book for aspiring entrepreneurs, corporate “intrapreneurs,” and anyone else looking to break the mold.

Bryan Mattimore is a big idea guy. For the past twenty-five years, he has helped Fortune 500 companies create over $3 billion in new innovations using his unique creative-thinking exercises. In 21 DAYS TO A BIG IDEA: CREATING BREAKTHROUGH BUSINESS CONCEPTS, Mattimore takes readers through a disciplined creative process to create original and practical new business concepts.

By investing less than an hour a day for twenty-one days, you will:

1) learn a new toolkit of creative thinking strategies and problem-solving techniques that can be used for solving a wide variety of both personal and professional challenges, and

2) generate more than a dozen new concepts from which to choose the highest potential/winning idea for a new start-up.

Entertaining and easy-to-follow, 21 DAYS TO A BIG IDEA is a must-read for all aspiring entrepreneurs, helping you to discover and implement your first—or your next—biggest idea.

12. A/B Testing by Dan Siroker and Pete Koomen

The average conversion rate—the rate at which visitors convert into customers—across the web is only 2%. That means it’s likely that 98% of visitors to your website won’t end up converting into customers.

What’s the solution? A/B testing.

A/B testing is the simple idea of showing several different versions of a web page to live traffic, and then measuring the effect each version has on visitors. Using A/B testing, companies can improve the effectiveness of their marketing and user experience and, in doing so, can sometimes double or triple their conversion rates. Testing has been fundamental in driving the success of Google, Amazon, Netflix, and other top tech companies. Even Barack Obama and Mitt Romney had dedicated teams A/B testing their campaign websites during the 2012 Presidential race.

In the past, marketing teams were unable to unleash the power of A/B testing because it required costly engineering and IT resources. Today, a new generation of technology that enables marketers to run A/B tests without depending on engineers is emerging and quickly becoming one of the most powerful tools for making data-driven decisions.

Authors Dan Siroker and Pete Koomen are cofounders of Optimizely, the leading A/B testing platform used by more than 5,000 organizations across the world. A/B Testing: The Most Powerful Way to Turn Clicks Into Customers offers best practices and lessons learned from more than 300,000 experiments run by Optimizely customers. You’ll learn:

  • What to test
  • How to choose the testing solution that’s right for your organization
  • How to assemble an A/B testing dream team
  • How to create personalized experiences for every visitor
  • And much more

Marketers and web professionals will become obsolete if they don’t embrace a data-driven approach to decision making. This book shows you how, no matter your technical expertise.

13. Better and Faster by Jeremy Gutsche

In our world of chaos and change, what are you overlooking? If you knew the answer, you’d be a better innovator, better manager, and better investor.

This audiobook will make you better by teaching you how to overcome three neurological traps that block successful people, like you, from realizing your full potential. Then, it will make you faster by teaching you six patterns of opportunity – convergence, divergence, cyclicality, redirection, reduction, and acceleration. Each pattern you’ll learn is a repeatable shortcut that has created fortunes for ex-criminals, reclusive billionaires, disruptive CEOs, and ordinary people who unexpectedly made it big.

In an unparalleled study of 250,000 ideas, Jeremy and his TrendHunter.com team have leveraged their 100 million-person audience to study what actually causes opportunity: data-driven research that was never before possible. The result is a series of frameworks battle tested with several hundred brands and top executives at some of the most successful companies in the world who rely on Jeremy to accelerate their hunt for ideas.

Now, for the first time, you can learn the same tactics to out-innovate, outsmart, and outmaneuver your competitors. You will learn to see patterns and clues wherever you look that will put you on the smarter, easier path to finding those breakthrough ideas faster.

14. Beyond Entrepreneurship 2.0 by Jim Collins

What’s the roadmap to create a company that not only survives its infancy but thrives, changing the world for decades to come?

Nine years before the publication of his epochal bestseller Good to Great, Jim Collins and his mentor, Bill Lazier, answered this question in their bestselling book, Beyond Entrepreneurship.

Beyond Entrepreneurship left a definitive mark on the business community, influencing the young pioneers who were, at that time, creating the technology revolution that was birthing in Silicon Valley. Decades later, successive generations of entrepreneurs still turn to the strategies outlined in Beyond Entrepreneurship to answer the most pressing business questions.

BE 2.0 is a new and improved version of the book that Jim Collins and Bill Lazier wrote years ago. In BE 2.0, Jim Collins honors his mentor, Bill Lazier, who passed away in 2005, and reexamines the original text of Beyond Entrepreneurship with his 2020 perspective.

The book includes the original text of Beyond Entrepreneurship, as well as four new chapters and fifteen new essays. BE 2.0 pulls together the key concepts across Collins’ thirty years of research into one integrated framework called The Map. The result is a singular reading experience, which presents a unified vision of company creation that will fascinate not only Jim’s millions of dedicated readers worldwide, but also introduce a new generation to his remarkable work.

15. Big Bang Disruption by Larry Downes

It used to take years or even decades for disruptive innovations to dethrone dominant products and services. But now any business can be devastated virtually overnight by something better and cheaper. How can executives protect themselves and harness the power of Big Bang Disruption?

Just a few years ago, drivers happily spent more than $200 for a GPS unit. But as smartphones exploded in popularity, free navigation apps exceeded the performance of stand-alone devices. Eighteen months after the debut of the navigation apps, leading GPS manufacturers had lost 85 percent of their market value.

Consumer electronics and computer makers have long struggled in a world of exponential technology improvements and short product life spans. But until recently, hotels, taxi services, doctors, and energy companies had little to fear from the information revolution.

Those days are gone forever. Software-based products are replacing physical goods. And every service provider must compete with cloud-based tools that offer customers a better way to interact.

Today, start-ups with minimal experience and no capital can unravel your strategy before you even begin to grasp what’s happening. Never mind the “innovator’s dilemma”—this is the innovator’s disaster. And it’s happening in nearly every industry.

Worse, Big Bang Disruptors may not even see you as competition. They don’t share your approach to customer service, and they’re not sizing up your product line to offer better prices. You may simply be collateral damage in their efforts to win completely different markets.

The good news is that any business can master the strategy of the start-ups. Larry Downes and Paul Nunes analyze the origins, economics, and anatomy of Big Bang Disruption. They identify four key stages of the new innovation life cycle, helping you spot potential disruptors in time. And they offer twelve rules for defending your markets, launching disruptors of your own, and getting out while there’s still time.

Based on extensive research by the Accenture Institute for High Performance and in-depth interviews with entrepreneurs, investors, and executives from more than thirty industries, Big Bang Disruption will arm you with strategies and insights to thrive in this brave new world.

16. Big Weed by Christian Hageseth

Legal marijuana is the hottest story in the US today. Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have authorized sales in some form; Denver has more legal marijuana dispensaries than Starbucks franchises. 

We are witnessing the dawn of a new industry. And like the early days of gourmet coffee chains, the rules and players are being established on the fly. Christian Hageseth is the face of the revolution–an entrepreneur and father of three who worked in the white-collar professional world for 20 years before opening his first dispensary. 

The founder and chairman of Green Man Cannabis, the fastest-growing marijuana company in the country, he’s the perfect tour guide through the wild frontier, where police hardly know what laws to enforce, or parents what to tell their kids. He paints a colorful picture not only of how he got into the business, but of the big interests that are eager to do the same–namely Big Tobacco, Big Agra, and Big Pharma.

He predicts a future where the marijuana market splits in two: the high-end, artisanal market, supplied by individual growers and small farms, and the mass market, covered by the cigarette giants and anyone bold enough to compete with them. Much like beer and coffee, your brand of weed will be just one more reflection of your lifestyle. It’s an entrepreneur’s dream, and Hageseth invites us along as he pitches skeptical investors, negotiates a shaggy cast of colleagues, and builds the biggest business he can.

17. Blitzscaling by Reid Hoffman and Chris Yeh

What entrepreneur or founder doesn’t aspire to build the next Amazon, Facebook, or Airbnb?  Yet those who actually manage to do so are exceedingly rare.  So what separates the startups that get disrupted and disappear from the ones who grow to become global giants?

The secret is blitzscaling: a set of techniques for scaling up at a dizzying pace that blows competitors out of the water. The objective of Blitzscaling is not to go from zero to one, but from one to one billion –as quickly as possible.

When growing at a breakneck pace, getting to next level requires very different strategies from those that got you to where you are today. In a book inspired by their popular class at Stanford Business School, Hoffman and Yeh  reveal how to navigate the necessary shifts and weather the unique challenges that arise at each stage of a company’s life cycle, such as: how to design business models for igniting and sustaining relentless growth; strategies for hiring and managing; how the role of the founder and company culture must evolve as the business matures, and more.  

Whether your business has ten employees or ten thousand, Blitzscaling is the essential playbook for winning in a world where speed is the only competitive advantage that matters.

18. Boss It by Carl Reader

Do you dream of ditching the day job, doing your own thing and being your own boss? Are you ready to Boss It?

In this invigorating and highly practical book, serial entrepreneur Carl Reader provides exactly the fire and guidance you need to get started. Designed to cut through the business jargon, this handy guide will take you through everything you need to establish and run your own business – from the mindset it takes to turn a dream into a plan, to the need-to-know practical stuff for running and growing a business.

Featuring case studies, templates and exercises to help you put what you read into action, and turn that dream into a reality, this motivational book will enable you to be your own boss, to take control of your income, your time and your life… and Boss It.

19. Brave New Work by Aaron Dignan

When fast-scaling startups and global organizations get stuck, they call Aaron Dignan. In this book, he reveals his proven approach for eliminating red tape, dissolving bureaucracy, and doing the best work of your life.

He’s found that nearly everyone, from Wall Street to Silicon Valley, points to the same frustrations: lack of trust, bottlenecks in decision making, siloed functions and teams, meeting and email overload, tiresome budgeting, short-term thinking, and more.

Is there any hope for a solution? Haven’t countless business gurus promised the answer, yet changed almost nothing about the way we work?

That’s because we fail to recognize that organizations aren’t machines to be predicted and controlled. They’re complex human systems full of potential waiting to be released.

Dignan says you can’t fix a team, department, or organization by tinkering around the edges. Over the years, he has helped his clients completely reinvent their operating systems—the fundamental principles and practices that shape their culture—with extraordinary success.

Imagine a bank that abandoned traditional budgeting, only to outperform its competition for decades. An appliance manufacturer that divided itself into 2,000 autonomous teams, resulting not in chaos but rapid growth. A healthcare provider with an HQ of just 50 people supporting over 14,000 people in the field—that is named the “best place to work” year after year. And even a team that saved $3 million per year by cancelling one monthly meeting.

Their stories may sound improbable, but in Brave New Work you’ll learn exactly how they and other organizations are inventing a smarter, healthier, and more effective way to work. Not through top down mandates, but through a groundswell of autonomy, trust, and transparency.

Whether you lead a team of ten or ten thousand, improving your operating system is the single most powerful thing you can do. The only question is, are you ready?

20. Building Social Business by Muhammad Yunus

Muhammad Yunus, the practical visionary who pioneered microcredit and, with his Grameen Bank, won the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, has developed a new dimension for capitalism which he calls “social business.” 

The social business model has been adopted by corporations, entrepreneurs, and social activists across the globe. Its goal is to create self-supporting, viable commercial enterprises that generate economic growth as they produce goods and services to fulfill human needs. 

In Building Social Business, Yunus shows how social business can be put into practice and explains why it holds the potential to redeem the failed promise of free-market enterprise.

21. Building Your Business the Right-Brain Way by Jennifer Lee

If you’ve started a business, you know that the journey toward success can be both invigorating and confusing, so where can you find advice that is practical and focused but still as playful and passionate as you are? Look no further than this book, which combines solid business expertise with a right-brain perspective that inspires creativity and innovation. Jennifer Lee’s fresh, empowering approach emphasizes taking action and continually improving to achieve extraordinary long-term results.

Building Your Business the Right-Brain Way offers real-world-tested techniques that can benefit all sorts of businesses, whether you’re a sole proprietor running a coaching practice, a crafter looking to license products, a wellness professional with a team of employees, or any creative soul making a meaningful difference with your work. You’ll discover how to:

  • assess your business’s unique “ecosystem”
  • build your brand and attract, engage, and keep ideal customers
  • develop new income streams that better leverage your time and resources
  • promote your products and services with authenticity and ease
  • grow your team (virtual and in-person) and manage staff and vendors
  • establish infrastructure and procedures to keep operations running smoothly
  • carve out vital white space to pause, reflect, and celebrate

22. Built to Last by Jim Collins

“This is not a book about charismatic visionary leaders. It is not about visionary product concepts or visionary products or visionary market insights. Nor is it about just having a corporate vision. This is a book about something far more important, enduring, and substantial. This is a book about visionary companies.” So write Jim Collins and Jerry Porras in this groundbreaking book that shatters myths, provides new insights, and gives practical guidance to those who would like to build landmark companies that stand the test of time.

Drawing upon a six-year research project at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business, Collins and Porras took eighteen truly exceptional and long-lasting companies — they have an average age of nearly one hundred years and have outperformed the general stock market by a factor of fifteen since 1926 — and studied each company in direct comparison to one of its top competitors. They examined the companies from their very beginnings to the present day — as start-ups, as midsize companies, and as large corporations. Throughout, the authors asked: “What makes the truly exceptional companies different from other companies?”

What separates General Electric, 3M, Merck, Wal-Mart, Hewlett-Packard, Walt Disney, and Philip Morris from their rivals? How, for example, did Procter & Gamble, which began life substantially behind rival Colgate, eventually prevail as the premier institution in its industry? How was Motorola able to move from a humble battery repair business into integrated circuits and cellular communications, while Zenith never became dominant in anything other than TVs? How did Boeing unseat McDonnell Douglas as the world’s best commercial aircraft company — what did Boeing have that McDonnell Douglas lacked?

By answering such questions, Collins and Porras go beyond the incessant barrage of management buzzwords and fads of the day to discover timeless qualities that have consistently distinguished out-standing companies. They also provide inspiration to all executives and entrepreneurs by destroying the false but widely accepted idea that only charismatic visionary leaders can build visionary companies.

Filled with hundreds of specific examples and organized into a coherent framework of practical concepts that can be applied by managers and entrepreneurs at all levels, Built to Last provides a master blueprint for building organizations that will prosper long into the twenty-first century and beyond.

23. Business Execution for RESULTS by Stephen Lynch

“Business Execution for RESULTS” was named Judges’ Choice Winner in the Management category of the 2014 Small Business Book Awards. The awards celebrate the best business books that appeal to entrepreneurs, managers, and their employees.

The Winners were chosen by an expert panel of 24 judges from the small business community in the USA. The criteria for judging the Winners included: quality and quantity of the content conveyed; usefulness to small business owners and entrepreneurs; and freshness of the subject matter or how it was treated. The level of fan support for each Winner was also taken into account.

Ready for Better Business RESULTS?

In this practical guide for small to mid-sized companies, Stephen Lynch takes you through the proven strategic planning and business execution processes you need to drive better business RESULTS.

Stephen was part of the RESULTS.com leadership team for 13 years. He designed the consulting methodology and managed a global team of more than 50 strategy consultants. Later on, he helped design RESULTS’ SaaS software functionality, which aligned employee goals with company strategy and facilitates meetings and communications.

With unique insights into the operations of thousands of growth firms around the world, he’s seen what really works (and what doesn’t) in terms of strategic planning, business execution, goal setting, tracking performance, running effective meetings, managing business operations, building sales and customer success processes, training frontline managers, holding employees accountable, and how to coach performance.

In Business Execution for RESULTS, Stephen replicates the methodology he personally uses when he works with leadership teams of small and mid-sized firms globally. It incorporates the best of dozens of effective business practices modified to work together in a process that will get you RESULTS.

24. Can You Learn to be Lucky by Karla Starr

“Do you believe in luck?” is a polarizing question, one you might ask on a first date. Some of us believe that we make our own luck. Others see inequality everywhere and think that everyone’s fate is at the whim of the cosmos. Karla Starr has a third answer: unlucky, “random” outcomes have predictable effects on our behavior that often make us act in self-defeating ways without even realizing it.

In this groundbreaking book, Starr traces wealth, health, and happiness back to subconscious neurological processes, blind cultural assumptions, and tiny details you’re in the habit of overlooking. Each chapter reveals how we can cultivate personal strengths to overcome life’s unlucky patterns. For instance:

  • Everyone has free access to that magic productivity app—motivation. The problem? It isn’t evenly distributed. What lucky accidents of history explain patterns behind why certain groups of people are more motivated in some situations than others?
  • If you look like an underperforming employee, your resume can’t override the gut-level assumptions that a potential boss will make from your LinkedIn photo. How can we make sure that someone’s first impression is favorable?
  • Just as people use irrelevant traits to make assumptions about your intelligence, kindness, and trustworthiness, we also make inaccurate snap judgments. How do these judgments affect our interactions, and what should we assume about others to maximize our odds of having lucky encounters?

We don’t always realize when the world’s invisible biases work to our advantage or recognize how much of a role we play in our own lack of luck. By ending the guessing game about how luck works, Starr allows you to improve your fortunes while expending minimal effort.

25. Case Interview Secrets by Victor Cheng

In Case Interview Secrets, you’ll discover step-by-step instructions on how to dominate what many consider to be the most complex, most difficult, and most intimidating corporate job interview in the world—the infamous case interview. 

Victor Cheng, a former McKinsey management consultant, reveals his proven, insider’s method for acing the case interview. Having personally secured job offers from McKinsey, Bain & Company, Monitor, L.E.K, Oliver Wyman, and A.T. Kearney, he has also been a McKinsey case interviewer—providing you with a hands-on, real-world perspective on what it really takes to land job offers.Cheng’s protégées work in all the major strategy management consulting firms, including McKinsey, The Boston Consulting Group, Bain & Company, Monitor Company, A.T. Kearny, Oliver Wyman, L.E.K, Roland Berger, Accenture, and Deloitte, as well as in the strategic planning departments of numerous Fortune 500 companies. 

Whether you’re an undergraduate, MBA, PhD, or experienced-hire applicant candidate, you’ll discover:* What case interviewers really say about you behind closed doors but wouldn’t dare tell you—until now* The subtle yet specific performance differences that separate those who get management consulting offers from those who don’t* The 10 biggest mistakes candidates make in case interviews (and how to avoid them)* The 3 specific things interviewers expect in the first 5 minutes of a case that often decide the outcome on the spot* An insider’s take on what interviewers really look for and why—and how to give them what they want

26. Chaos Monkeys by Antonio Garcia Martinez

Imagine a chimpanzee rampaging through a datacenter powering everything from Google to Facebook. Infrastructure engineers use a software version of this “chaos monkey” to test online services’ robustness—their ability to survive random failure and correct mistakes before they actually occur. Tech entrepreneurs are society’s chaos monkeys. One of Silicon Valley’s most audacious chaos monkeys is Antonio García Martínez.

After stints on Wall Street and as CEO of his own startup, García Martínez joined Facebook’s nascent advertising team. Forced out in the wake of an internal product war over the future of the company’s monetization strategy, García Martínez eventually landed at rival Twitter. In Chaos Monkeys, this gleeful contrarian unravels the chaotic evolution of social media and online marketing and reveals how it is invading our lives and shaping our future.

27. Choose Possibility By Sukhinder Singh Cassidy

Life is made up of a series of choices. What do you do if one of those choices turns out poorly, especially if it was carefully considered? How do you trust your instinctive decision-making skills and make the next right choice? How do you continue to take risks when, suddenly, your risks are not working out?

Sukhinder Singh Cassidy is one of the most highly regarded and well-respected female tech executives in Silicon Valley, but she’ll be the first to admit that her path to success has been far from linear. She started three companies that have done exceedingly well, including theBoardlist (an organization designed to promote and place women onto corporate boards), and she just served as president of StubHub, which sold earlier this year for $4 billion.

But she’s also encountered plenty of poor choices, misfires, unexpected headwinds, and all other types of pitfalls that she had to learn how to confront, analyze, navigate, and incorporate into her new path forward. From her own experience, she knows that personal success does not come from making one singular “correct” or “big” decision. Rather, long-range success comes from tackling numerous choices that are aimed to optimize future possibilities.

Singh Cassidy’s “seven myths of success,” as well as her advice on how to make FOMO into your friend, multiply your “bets” in life, and understand why you shouldn’t be blinded by “passion bias,” all provide an entirely new way to approach risk-taking and achieve lasting success.

28. Clay Water Brick by Jessica Jackley

In the tradition of Kabul Beauty School and Start Something That Matters comes an inspiring story of social entrepreneurship from the co-founder of Kiva, the first online microlending platform for the working poor. Featuring lessons learned from successful businesses in the world’s poorest countries, Jessica Jackley’s Clay Water Brick will motivate readers to more deeply appreciate the incredible entrepreneurial potential that exists in every human being on this planet—especially themselves.

“The heart of entrepreneurship is never about what we have. It’s about what we do.”

Meet Patrick, who had next to nothing and started a thriving business using just the ground beneath his feet . . .

 Blessing, who built her shop right in the middle of the road, refusing to take the chance that her customers might pass her by…

Constance, who cornered the banana market in her African village with her big personality and sense of mission. 

Patrick, Blessing, Constance, and many others are among the poorest of the world’s poor. And yet they each had crucial lessons to teach Jessica Jackley—lessons about resilience, creativity, perseverance, and, above all, entrepreneurship.

For as long as she could remember, Jackley, the co-founder of the revolutionary microlending site Kiva, had a singular and urgent ambition: to help alleviate global poverty. While in her twenties, she set off for Africa to finally meet the people she had long dreamed of helping. The insights of those she met changed her understanding. Today she believes that many of the most inspiring entrepreneurs in the world are not focused on high-tech ventures or making a lot of money; instead, they wake up every day and build better lives for themselves, their families, and their communities, regardless of the things they lack or the obstacles they encounter. As Jackley puts it, “The greatest entrepreneurs succeed not because of what they possess but because of what they are determined to do.”

In Clay Water Brick, Jackley challenges readers to embrace entrepreneurship as a powerful force for change in the world. She shares her own story of founding Kiva with little more than a laptop and a dream, and the stories and the lessons she has learned from those across the globe who are doing the most with the least.

29. Clockwork by Mike Michalowicz

Do you worry that your business will collapse without your constant presence? Are you sacrificing your family, friendships, and freedom to keep your business alive? What if instead your business could run itself, freeing you to do what you love when you want, while it continues to grow and turn a profit?

It’s possible. And it’s easier than you think.

If you’re like most entrepreneurs, you started your business so you could be your own boss, make the money you deserve, and live life on your own terms. In reality, you’re bogged down in the daily grind, constantly putting out fires, answering an endless stream of questions, and continually hunting for cash.

Now, Mike Michalowicz, the author of Profit First and other small-business bestsellers, offers a straightforward step-by-step path out of this dilemma. In Clockwork, he draws on more than six years of research and real life examples to explain his simple approach to making your business ultra-efficient.

Among other powerful strategies, you will discover how to:

  • Make your employees act like owners: Free yourself from micromanaging by using a simple technique to empower your people to make smart decisions without you.
  • Pinpoint your business’s most important function: Unleash incredible efficiency by identifying and focusing everyone on the one function that is most crucial to your business.
  • Know what to fix next: Most entrepreneurs try to fix every inefficiency at once and end up fixing nothing. Use the “weakest link in the chain” method to find the one fix that will add the most value now.

Whether you have a staff of one, one hundred, or somewhere in between, whether you’re a new entrepreneur or have been overworked and overstressed for years, Clockwork is your path to finally making your business work for you.

30. Company of One by Paul Jarvis

What if the real key to a more fulfilling career was not to scale up but to work for yourself and become a successful and sustainable company of one? The New York Times bestselling author of Deep Work Cal Newport calls this book a “must-read for any entrepreneur who prioritizes a rich life over riches.”

 Company of One offers a refreshingly original business strategy that’s focused on a commitment to being better instead of bigger. Why? Because staying small provides one with the freedom to pursue more meaningful pleasures in life—and avoid the headaches that come with traditional growth-oriented business. 

Having personally discovered the benefits of cutting out the corporate hierarchy that constantly demands more, author Paul Jarvis explains how you can do the same. With this groundbreaking guide, you’ll learn how to set up your shop, determine your desired revenues, deal with unexpected crises, keep your key clients happy, and find self-fulfillment every step of the way.

31. Content Inc. by Joe Pulizzi

From one of today’s leading experts in content marketing, Content Inc. is the go-to guide to building a solid small business by establishing a loyal audience before you sell products or services.

In these pages, Joe Pulizzi provides a lower-risk, more effective way to create a path to success by re-engineering the process that so often leads to failure: You’ll learn how to develop valuable content, build an audience around that content―and then create a product for that audience. Content Inc. walks you through the entire process, showing how to:

  • Choose a marketable content topic
  • Figure out where little or no competition exists
  • Choose your top channel for disseminating content
  • Build long-term customer loyalty
  • Monetize your product or service
  • Expand your content into multiple channels
  • Sell your content asset or scale it into a large enterprise

This updated edition includes new and enhanced coverage of platforms like TikTok, SnapChat, and Instagram, a new section about the exit strategy for the model, more practical how-tos, and current examples of companies that have successfully implemented these strategies.

Content Inc. provides an ingenious approach to business based on a profoundly simple concept: Having a singular focus on audience, and building a loyal audience directly, provide the best, most nuanced understanding of what products ultimately make the most sense to sell.

Apply the methods laid out for you in Content Inc., and create the business of your dreams.

32. Cooking Up a Business by Rachel Hofstetter

Do you have a passion for delicious food and want to create your own business out of it, but have no idea where to start? Cooking Up a Business is essential reading for aspiring entrepreneurs and gives you a real-world, up-close-and-personal preview of the exciting journey. Through profiles and interviews with nationally known food entrepreneurs from Popchips, Vosges Haut-Chocolat, Hint Water, Mary’s Gone Crackers, Love Grown Foods, Kopali Organics, Tasty, Evol, Justin’s Nut Butters, Cameron Hughes Wine, and more, you will gain applicable, practical guidance that teaches you how to succeed today:

  • How to create a national brand—with no connections or experience
  • The secret to getting meetings with grocery store buyers
  • The number one thing you need to know about food safety regulations
  • Why a grassroots budget might actually help you succeed
  • Specific advice for gluten-free, organic, wine, and beverage companies
  • What every entrepreneur wishes someone had told them at the beginning 
  • Why doing what you love is always a good idea

33. Cool by Steven Quartz & Anette Asp

Like it or not, we live in an age of conspicuous consumption. In a world of brand names, many of us judge ourselves and others by the products we own. 

Teenagers broadcast their brand allegiances over social media. Tourists flock to Rodeo Drive to have their pictures taken in front of luxury stores. Soccer moms switch from minivans to SUVs to hybrids, while hip beer connoisseurs flaunt their knack for distinguishing a Kölsch from a pilsner. How did this pervasive desire for “cool” emerge, and why is it so powerful today that it is a prime driver of the global economy?

In Cool, the neuroscientist and philosopher Steven Quartz and the political scientist Anette Asp bring together the latest findings in brain science, economics, and evolutionary biology to form a provocative theory of consumerism, revealing how the brain’s “social calculator” and an instinct to rebel are the crucial missing links in understanding the motivations behind our spending habits. Applying their theory to everything from grocery shopping to the near-religious devotion of Harley-Davidson fans, Quartz and Asp explore how the brain’s ancient decision-making machinery guides consumer choice. 

Using these revolutionary insights, they show how we use products to advertise ourselves to others in an often unconscious pursuit of social esteem. Surprising at every turn, Cool will change the way you think about money, status, desire, and choice.

34. Crazy is a Compliment by Linda Rottenberg

These days taking chances isn’t just for college dropouts in hoodies. Whether you work at a Fortune 500 company, a nonprofit, or a mom-and-pop, everybody needs to think and act like an entrepreneur. We all need to be nimble, adaptive, daring—and maybe even a little crazy—or risk being left behind.

But how do you take smart risks without risking it all? That’s Linda Rottenberg’s expertise. As the cofounder and CEO of Endeavor, the world’s leading organization dedicated to supporting fast-growing entrepreneurs, she’s spent the last two decades helping innovators think bold and execute smart.

Now Rottenberg draws on her unrivaled experience to show you the proven techniques to achieve your dreams: from overcoming fear to facing down critics, from stalking supporters to exploiting chaos. Crazy Is a Compliment combines inspiring stories, original research, and practical advice to create a road map for getting started and going bigger.

Rottenberg brings to life iconic entrepreneurs like Walt Disney and Estée Lauder and reveals how companies like MTV, GE, and Burberry found their best successes by breaking the corporate mold and embracing the entrepreneur mind-set. She also introduces us to some of the one thousand entrepreneurs she’s advised, like Leila Velez, who started a hair-care company in her kitchen sink in Rio that now earns $80 million a year.

35. Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey A. Moore

Here is the bestselling guide that created a new game plan for marketing in high-tech industries. Crossing the Chasm has become the bible for bringing cutting-edge products to progressively larger markets. 

This edition provides new insights into the realities of high-tech marketing, with special emphasis on the Internet. It’s essential reading for anyone with a stake in the world’s most exciting marketplace.

36. Crushing It by Gary Vaynerchuk

Four-time New York Times bestselling author Gary Vaynerchuk offers new lessons and inspiration drawn from the experiences of dozens of influencers and entrepreneurs who rejected the predictable corporate path in favor of pursuing their dreams by building thriving businesses and extraordinary personal brands.

In his 2009 international bestseller Crush It, Gary insisted that a vibrant personal brand was crucial to entrepreneurial success, In Crushing It!, Gary explains why that’s even more true today, offering his unique perspective on what has changed and what principles remain timeless. He also shares stories from other entrepreneurs who have grown wealthier—and not just financially—than they ever imagined possible by following Crush It principles. The secret to their success (and Gary’s) has everything to do with their understanding of the social media platforms, and their willingness to do whatever it took to make these tools work to their utmost potential. That’s what Crushing It! teaches readers to do.

In this lively, practical, and inspiring book, Gary dissects every current major social media platform so that anyone, from a plumber to a professional ice skater, will know exactly how to amplify his or her personal brand on each. He offers both theoretical and tactical advice on how to become the biggest thing on old standbys like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest, and Snapchat; podcast platforms like Spotify, Soundcloud, iHeartRadio, and iTunes; and other emerging platforms such as Musical.ly. For those with more experience, Crushing It! illuminates some little-known nuances and provides innovative tips and clever tweaks proven to enhance more common tried-and-true strategies.

Crushing It! is a state-of-the-art guide to building your own path to professional and financial success, but it’s not about getting rich. It’s a blueprint to living life on your own terms.

37. Dear Founder by Maynard Webb

More than 600,000 new businesses are launched each year. How can a start-up find the funding it needs to survive? When, if at all, should a company go public? How does an entrepreneur build and manage a workplace—and create a lasting legacy?

Maynard Webb has helped found, fund, and grow dozens of successful companies, and has driven strategic change at Salesforce, eBay, Everwise, and Visa, among other worldwide corporations. Known for offering savvy insight, encouragement, and a dose of reality in the form of engaging personal letters to a select group of business leaders, Webb now shares his lessons with the rest of America’s aspiring entrepreneurs—at any age and stage in their careers—in Dear Founder.

Featuring more than eighty inspiring, informative, and instructive letters, Dear Founder is rich with sound advice on an array of business topics, from turning your idea into a reality to building a culture, to reaching key financial goals. This book is an indispensable guide to navigating the realities, risks, and rewards of being your own boss—and founding the company of your dreams.

38. Difference By Bernadette Jiwa

We spent $500 billion globally on advertising in 2013. Every year we’re spending more money, to interrupt more people, more often, with messages they don’t care about and don’t pay attention to. We’ve come to believe that the way to succeed is to have an advantage—by being different or better, more visible, or just plain louder.

What if, instead of finding ways to be one step ahead of your competition, you could build and market your business to give people a reason to choose you? What if you could completely reinvent a category or experience? What if you could stop trying to beat the competition, and become the competition?

Difference lifts the lid on how brands like Airbnb, Uber and Apple have succeeded by creating difference and gives you a new one-page method for reimagining your business and reinventing your marketing. It helps you to recognise opportunities that create value, to develop products and services that people want, and to matter to your customers.

39. Diffusion of Innovations by Everett M. Rogers

In this renowned book, Everett M. Rogers, professor and chair of the Department of Communication & Journalism at the University of New Mexico, explains how new ideas spread via communication channels over time. 

Such innovations are initially perceived as uncertain and even risky. To overcome this uncertainty, most people seek out others like themselves who have already adopted the new idea. Thus the diffusion process consists of a few individuals who first adopt an innovation, then spread the word among their circle of acquaintances—a process which typically takes months or years. 

But there are exceptions: use of the Internet in the 1990s, for example, may have spread more rapidly than any other innovation in the history of humankind. 

Furthermore, the Internet is changing the very nature of diffusion by decreasing the importance of physical distance between people. The fifth edition addresses the spread of the Internet, and how it has transformed the way human beings communicate and adopt new ideas.

40. Disrupt You By Jay Samit

In Disrupt You!, Jay Samit, a digital media expert who has launched, grown, and sold start-ups and Fortune 500 companies alike, describes the unique method he has used to invent new markets and expand established businesses.

In today’s volatile business landscape, adaptability and creativity are more crucial than ever. It is no longer possible-or even desirable-to learn one set of job skills and to work your way up the ladder. At the same time, entrepreneurs with great ideas for new products or technologies that could change the world often struggle to capture the attention of venture capital firms and incubators; finding the funding necessary to launch a start-up can feel impossible. The business leaders of our future must anticipate change to create their own opportunities for personal satisfaction and professional success.

Samit has been at the helm of businesses in the ecommerce, digital video, social media, mobile communications, and software industries, helping to navigate them through turbulent economic times and guide them through necessary transformation so that they stay ahead of the curve. In Disrupt You!, he reveals how specific strategies that help companies flourish can be applied at an individual level to help anyone can achieve success and lasting prosperity-without needing to raise funds from outside investors.

Incorporating stories from his own experience and anecdotes from other innovators and disruptive businesses-including Richard Branson, Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, YouTube, Circ du Soleil, Odor Eaters, Iams, Silly Putty, and many more-Samit shows how personal transformation can reap entrepreneurial and professional rewards.Disrupt You! offers clear and empowering advice for anyone looking to break through; for anyone with a big idea but with no idea how to apply it; and for anyone worried about being made irrelevant in an era of technological transformation. This engaging, perspective-shifting book demystifies the mechanics of disruption for individuals and businesses alike.

41. Disrupted By Dan Lyons

For twenty-five years Dan Lyons was a magazine writer at the top of his profession–until one Friday morning when he received a phone call: Poof. His job no longer existed. “I think they just want to hire younger people,” his boss at Newsweek told him. Fifty years old and with a wife and two young kids, Dan was, in a word, screwed. Then an idea hit. Dan had long reported on Silicon Valley and the tech explosion. Why not join it? HubSpot, a Boston start-up, was flush with $100 million in venture capital. They offered Dan a pile of stock options for the vague role of “marketing fellow.” What could go wrong?

HubSpotters were true believers: They were making the world a better place … by selling email spam. The office vibe was frat house meets cult compound: The party began at four thirty on Friday and lasted well into the night; “shower pods” became hook-up dens; a push-up club met at noon in the lobby, while nearby, in the “content factory,” Nerf gun fights raged. Groups went on “walking meetings,” and Dan’s absentee boss sent cryptic emails about employees who had “graduated” (read: been fired). In the middle of all this was Dan, exactly twice the age of the average HubSpot employee, and literally old enough to be the father of most of his co-workers, sitting at his desk on his bouncy-ball “chair.”

42. Do More Faster by David Cohen

David Cohen and Brad Feld, leading advocates for entrepreneurs and startups, team up to provide first-time entrepreneurs with the tools, insights, and experiences to help them do more faster. The authors share their decades of experience working with thousands of startup founders and have enlisted the advice of dozens of Techstars startup founders and mentors. Contributors include Tim Ferriss, Eric Ries, Matt Mullenweg (WordPress), Isaac Saldana (SendGrid), and other successful entrepreneurs.

Co-founders of Techstars, the worldwide network that helps entrepreneurs succeed, Cohen and Feld recognize the daunting task of creating a sustainable business and have seen first-hand the common mistakes first-time entrepreneurs make over and over. The authors take the complexity and uncertainty of starting a business and distill the critical factors into seven themes: Ideas and Vision, People, Working Effectively, Product, Fundraising, Legal and Structure, and Work and Life Harmony. They share their hard-won successes, failures, and advice for anyone with an idea who wants to create a business.

Throughout the book crucial questions are raised and addressed from multiple perspectives.

  • How important is it to have an original idea?
  • How is founder conflict handled?
  • What are the tradeoffs between bootstrapping and financing?

Make-or-break decisions like company structure, hiring, and legal consequences are presented in an easy-to-understand style. Do More Faster will elevate your thinking on a range of important topics, help you avoid costly mistakes, and provide you with a resource to consult as you go from idea to successful business.

If you have the drive and desire to start a business, need to create a vibrant entrepreneurial ecosystem in your community, or want to spark greater innovation in your organization—don’t go it alone. Use the advice, tips, and tactics found throughout Do More Faster to give yourself the best chance of succeeding.

43. Do Scale by Les McKeown

Scaling up is something most founders aspire to, especially once the tricky start-up phase has been navigated. It can increase your reach and futureproof your business. But how do you ‘scale’? And how does it differ from ‘flipping’ for a quick profit or slower organic growth?

Les McKeown advises industry leaders on how to achieve scalable, sustainable growth. In Do Scale, he draws from his decades of experience to provide a clear understanding of what’s involved, and the strategies needed to take your business (or not-for-profit) to the next level. You’ll find out: What if means to scale – and if now is the right time * Why founders need to ‘get out of their own way’ * How to develop winning teams * Your secret weapon for decision making.

With practical advice and clear guidance, Do Scale is an essential manual for anyone looking to grow a successful and sustainable organisation – and turn it into something truly remarkable.

Les McKeown is the President and CEO of Predictable Success. He has started over 40 companies in his own right, and was the founding partner of an incubation consulting company that advised on the creation and growth of hundreds more organisations worldwide.

Since relocating from his native Ireland to the US in 1998, Les advises CEOs and senior managers on personal leadership and how to achieve scalable, sustainable growth. His clients range from large family-owned businesses to Fortune 100 companies, and include Harvard University, American Express, T-Mobile (EE), United Technologies and Chevron.

Based in Washington DC, Les spends his time consulting, writing, teaching and speaking. He has appeared on CNN, ABC, the BBC, and in USA Today and The New York Times. He writes a regular column for Inc magazine. His previous publications include the bestselling Predictable Success, The Synergist, and Do Lead (Do Books, 2014).

44. Do the KIND Thing by Daniel Lubetzky

For the socially conscious, the intellectually curious, or the creative soul comes an inspiring, New York Times bestselling handbook for success in business, life, and the all-important task of building a more compassionate world—by the visionary founder and CEO of KIND Healthy Snacks.

When Daniel Lubetzky started KIND Healthy Snacks in 2004, he aimed to defy the conventional wisdom that snack bars could never be both tasty and healthy, convenient and wholesome. A decade later, the transformative power of the company’s “AND” philosophy has resulted in an astonishing record of achievement. KIND has become the fastest-growing purveyor of healthy snacks in the country. Meanwhile, the KIND Movement—the company’s social mission to make the world a little kinder—has sparked more than a million good deeds worldwide.

In Do the KIND Thing, Lubetzky shares the revolutionary principles that have shaped KIND’s business model and led to its success, while offering an unfiltered and intensely personal look into the mind of a pioneering social entrepreneur. Inspired by his father, who survived the Holocaust thanks to the courageous kindness of strangers, Lubetzky began his career handselling a sun-dried tomato spread made collaboratively by Arabs and Jews in the war-torn Middle East. Despite early setbacks, he never lost his faith in his vision of a “not-only-for-profit” business—one that sold great products and helped to make the world a better place.

While other companies let circumstances force them into choosing between two seemingly incompatible options, people at KIND say “AND.” At its core, this idea is about challenging assumptions and false compromises. It is about not settling for less and being willing to take greater risks, often financial. It is about learning to think boundlessly and critically, and choosing what at first may be the tougher path for later, greater rewards. By using illuminating anecdotes from his own career, and celebrating some past failures through the lessons learned from them, Lubetzky outlines his core tenets for building a successful business and a thriving social enterprise. He explores the value of staying true to your brand, highlights the importance of transparency and communication in the workplace, and explains why good intentions alone won’t sell products.

Engaging and inspirational, Do the KIND Thing shows how the power of AND worked wonders for one company—and could empower the next generation of social entrepreneurs to improve their bottom line and change the world.

45. Dogfight by Fred Vogelstein

The rise of smartphones and tablets has altered the industry of making computers. At the center of this change are Apple and Google, two companies whose philosophies, leaders, and commercial acumen have steamrolled the competition. In the age of Android and the iPad, these corporations are locked in a feud that will play out not just in the mobile marketplace but in the courts and on screens around the world.

Fred Vogelstein has reported on this rivalry for more than a decade and has rare access to its major players. In Dogfight, he takes us into the offices and board rooms where company dogma translates into ruthless business; behind outsize personalities like Steve Jobs, Apple’s now-lionized CEO, and Eric Schmidt, Google’s executive chairman; and inside the deals, lawsuits, and allegations that mold the way we communicate. Apple and Google are poaching each other’s employees. They bid up the price of each other’s acquisitions for spite, and they forge alliances with major players like Facebook and Microsoft in pursuit of market dominance.

Dogfight reads like a novel: vivid nonfiction with never-before-heard details. This is more than a story about what devices will replace our cell phones and laptops. It’s about who will control the content on those devices and where that content will come from—about the future of media and the Internet in Silicon Valley, New York, and Hollywood.

46. Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited by Steve Krug

Since Don’t Make Me Think was first published in 2000, hundreds of thousands of Web designers and developers have relied on usability guru Steve Krug’s guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design. Witty, commonsensical, and eminently practical, it’s one of the best-loved and most recommended books on the subject.

Now Steve returns with fresh perspective to reexamine the principles that made Don’t Make Me Think a classic–with updated examples and a new chapter on mobile usability. And it’s still short, profusely illustrated…and best of all–fun to read.

If you’ve read it before, you’ll rediscover what made Don’t Make Me Think so essential to Web designers and developers around the world. If you’ve never read it, you’ll see why so many people have said it should be required reading for anyone working on Web sites.

47. Dream Teams by Shane Snow

The best teams are more than the sum of their parts, but why does collaboration so often fail to fulfill this promise? In Dream Teams, Snow takes us on an adventure through history, neuroscience, psychology, and business, exploring what separates groups that simply get by together from those that get better together.

You’ll learn:

  • How ragtag teams–from soccer clubs to startups to gangs of pirates–beat the odds throughout history.
  • Why DaimlerChrysler flopped while the Wu-Tang Clan succeeded, and the surprising factor behind most failed mergers, marriages, and partnerships.
  • What the Wright Brothers’ daily arguments can teach us about group problem solving.
  • Pioneering women in law enforcement, unlikely civil rights collaborators, and underdog armies that did the incredible together.
  • The team players behind great social movements in history, and the science of becoming open-minded.

Provocative and entertaining, Dream Teams is a landmark work that will change the way we think about people, progress, and collaboration.

48. Dropshipping by James Moore

Perhaps the most essential advantage to dropshipping is that it’s possible to launch an e-commerce store without the need to invest thousands of dollars in inventory to start with. Customarily, merchants have had to tie up vast amounts of capital when acquiring stock. 

But, this is unnecessary if you use dropshipping. With a dropshipping model, there is no need to purchase a product without you already having made the sale, and having been paid by your customer. 

Devoid of substantial up-front inventory investments, it is very possible to begin a thriving dropshipping business without minimal financial backup.

49. Employee to Entrepreneur by Steve Glaveski

Are you living for the weekend? Are you dissatisfied at work? Are you itching to do something that is important to you? How can you avoid the pitfalls that many first-time entrepreneurs have fallen into? How do you explore whether entrepreneurship is right for you without giving up your day job? Employee to Entrepreneur is your guide to leaving your job behind and building something for yourself.

Author and employee-turned-entrepreneur Steve Glaveski, shows you how to navigate the challenges, find the entrepreneurial success that is right for you and become a better person along the way. Employee to Entrepreneur combines storytelling with a step-by-step framework to teach you how to effectively explore and leverage entrepreneurship to gain freedom, fulfillment and financial security. 

  • understand what you want to do by first understanding yourself
  • explore if entrepreneurship is right for you without giving up your day job
  • avoid the common pitfalls faced by first-time entrepreneurs
  • fund, test and prioritise your ideas in a fast and cost-effective way
  • develop the mindset to succeed in your business.

If you’re ready to leave your cushy employee life behind and build a business and a life you believe in, reading this essential guidebook is your first step to making it happen.

50. Escape from Cubicle Nation by Pamela Slim

Pamela Slim, a former corporate training manager, left her office job twelve years ago to go solo and has enjoyed every bit of it.

In her groundbreaking book, based on her popular blog Escape from Cubicle Nation, Slim explores both the emotional issues of leaving the corporate world and the nuts and bolts of launching a business. Drawing on her own career, as well as stories from her coaching clients and blog readers, Slim will help readers weigh their options, and make a successful escape if they decide to go for it.

51. Everybody Has a Podcast by Justin McElroy

Justin, Travis, and Griffin McElroy made their names as “advice giving brothers who have no business giving advice” (New York Times) on the hit podcast My Brother, My Brother and Me. But while they may not have the best relationship or workplace advice, they certainly make you laugh, and they do know a thing or two about podcasting.  

In fact, the McElroy Brothers have spent the last decade making podcasts, including My Brother, My Brother and Me; The Adventure Zone; Sawbones; and more. From their start, independently producing and releasing the early episodes of My Brother, My Brother and Me, to their eleven currently available podcasts, the McElroys have become experts in creating successful podcasts. And now, they want to share what they’ve learned with you.

In Everybody Has a Podcast (Except You), the McElroy Brothers will walk you through the process of turning an idea into ear-candy for legions of fans, sharing their expertise on everything from deciding on an effective name (definitely not something like My Brother, My Brother and Me), what type of microphone to use (definitely not one from the video game Rock Band), to making lots and lots of money (spoiler: you probably won’t).

A must-read for anyone interested in podcasting, Everybody Has a Podcast (Except You) shares the keys to success as well as the mistakes to avoid and draws on the vast experiences of three of the funniest and most successful podcasters working today.

52. Everything I Know by Paul Jarvis

The last thing the world needs is another “get-rich-like-me,” self-proclaimed expert on what it takes to work for yourself. Anti-guru Paul Jarvis has written Everything I Know as a no-rules guide through uncharted territory with stories based on his two decades of freelancing.

Instead of offering one-size-fits-all advice, Paul provides an infinitely flexible template for adventure. There is a better, more satisfying path out there, if you’re willing to take risks and explore new territory. This book provides practical ideas and questions to help you conquer fear, overcome inertia, embrace vulnerability, validate your plans and most importantly, launch them.

53. F.I.R.E. by Dan Ward

Noted military technology expert Dan Ward’s manifesto for creating great products and projects using the methods of rapid innovation.

Why do some programs deliver their product under cost, while others bust their budget? Why do some deliver ahead of schedule, while others experience endless delays? Which products work better—the quick and thrifty or the slow and expensive? Which situation leads to superior equipment?

With nearly two decades as an engineering officer in the U. S. Air Force, Dan Ward explored these questions during tours of duty at military research laboratories, the Air Force Institute of Technology, an intelligence agency, the Pentagon and Afghanistan. The pattern he noticed revealed that the most successful project leaders in both the public and private sectors delivered top-shelf products with a skeleton crew, a shoestring budget, and a cannonball schedule. Excessive investment of time, money, or complexity actually reduced innovation. He concluded the secret to innovation is to be fast, inexpensive, simple, and small.

FIRE presents an entertaining and practical framework for pursuing rapid, frugal innovation. A story-filled blend of pop culture and engineering insight, FIRE has something for everyone: strategic concepts leaders can use as they cast a vision, actionable principles for managers as they make business decisions, and practical tools for workers as they design, build, assess and test new products.

54. Fair Pay Fair Play by Robin A. Ferracone

Recognized as the leading expert on executive compensation, Robin Ferracone combines her own 20 years of experience with interviews with executives and compensation committees to provide a clear examination of and guidance on determining pay packages, actions, and designs. and Over the past 25 years, the author has created a database of executive pay across 44,000 companies, broken down by company performance, company revenue and industry. Using this data, the author provides boards and individuals evaluating executive pay with the ability to analytically determine an appropriate compensation package.

  • Provides real-life stories, perspectives, and insights from thought leaders on executive compensation
  • Contains interview with compensation committee members, executives, academicians, government leaders, and shareholder activists
  • Research based on 44,000 companies broken down by performance, revenue and industry

Offers a timely resource on a hot button topic.

55. FightBack Now by Felix Staeritz

This second book in the FightBack collection responds to the question: what could the ‘new normal’ look like? Felix Staeritz and Sven Jungmann believe that business leaders and organizations have have formidable tools at their disposal – not just to cope with this situation, but to recreate the world so they come out of this stronger and more inventive. As entrepreneurs, Staeritz and Jungmann are passionate about solving challenges through continuous experimentation, in search of the solutions that will define and shape the new normal.

At its core, this book is about the shared experiences of many business leaders, academics and entrepreneurs around how corporations can most effectively build new digital models to make the most of their existing assets. FightBack NOW is a timely and necessary book, challenging leaders and organizations to consider the new realities and the urgent problems which ultimately impact the future of every person and business.

56. Finding My Virginity by Richard Branson

Twenty years after his iconic memoir Losing My Virginity, the world’s ultimate entrepreneur is back with the rest of the story.

Richard Branson’s Losing My Virginity shared the outrageous tale of how he built Virgin from a student magazine into one of the greatest brands in history. No challenge was too daunting, no opportunity too outlandish to pursue. And each new adventure started with five simple words: “Screw it, let’s do it.”   

Now, 50 years after starting his first business, Branson shares the candid details of a lifetime of triumphs and failures and what he really thinks about his unique life and career. Finding My Virginity is an intimate look at his never-ending quest to push boundaries, break rules, and seek new frontiers – even after launching a dozen billion-dollar businesses and hundreds of other companies.   

As he led Virgin into the new millennium, Branson fearlessly expanded the brand into new categories such as mobile, media, fitness, and banking and into every corner of the globe – all while preserving its iconoclastic, scrappy spirit. He even brought Virgin into space with Virgin Galactic, the world’s first commercial spaceline. Finding My Virginity takes us behind the scenes of the incredible brains, heart, and sacrifices that have gone into making private spaceflight an imminent reality – even after the biggest crisis Branson has ever faced.   

But this book is much more than a series of business adventures. It’s also the story of Branson’s evolution from hotshot entrepreneur to passionate philanthropist and public servant, via Virgin Unite’s environmental and health initiatives and through the Elders, a council of influential global leaders. And it’s the story of his personal quest to become a better son, husband, father, and “grand-dude” to his four grandchildren.   

Featuring a supporting cast that includes everyone from Bill Gates to Kate Moss, Nelson Mandela to Barack Obama, this is the gripping account of a man who will never stop reaching for the stars, in more ways than one. Find out how Branson did it for the first time – all over again.

57. Finish Big by Bo Burlingham

When pioneering business journalist and Inc. magazine editor at large Bo Burlingham wrote Small Giants, it became an instant classic for its original take on a common business problem—how to handle the pressure to grow.

Now Burlingham is back to tackle an even more common problem—how to exit your company well. Sooner or later, all entrepreneurs leave their businesses and all businesses get sold, given away, or liquidated. Whatever your preferred outcome, you need to start planning for it while you still have time and options. The beautiful part is that if you start early enough, the process will lead you to build a better, stronger, more resilient company, as well as one with a higher market value. Unfortunately, most owners don’t start early enough—and pay a steep price for their procrastination.

Burlingham interviewed dozens of entrepreneurs across a range of industries and identified eight key factors that determine whether owners are happy after leaving their businesses. His book showcases the insights, exit plans, and cautionary tales of entrepreneurs such as

  • Ray Pagano: founder of a leading manufacturer of housings for security cameras. He turned down a bid for his company and instead changed his management style, resulting in a subsequent sale for four times the original offer.
  • Bill Niman: founder of the iconic Niman Ranch, which revolutionized the meat industry. He learned about unhappy exits when he was forced to sell to private equity investors, leaving him with nothing to show for his thirty-five years in business.
  • Gary Hirshberg: founder of organic yogurt pioneer Stonyfield Farm. He pulled off the nearly impossible task of finding a large company that would buy out his 275 small investors at a premium price while letting him retain complete control of the business.

Through such stories, Burlingham offers an illuminating and inspirational guide to one of the most stressful, and yet potentially rewarding, processes business owners must go through. And he explores the emotional challenges they face at every step of the way.

At the end of the day, owning a business is about more than selling goods and services. It’s about making choices that shape your entire life, both professional and personal. Finish Big helps you figure out how to face your future with confidence and be able to someday look back on your journey with pride.

58. First, Break all the Rules by Marcus Buckingham

Gallup presents the remarkable findings of its revolutionary study of more than 80,000 managers in First, Break All the Rules, revealing what the world’s greatest managers do differently. With vital performance and career lessons and ideas for how to apply them, it is a must-read for managers at every level.

Included with this re-release of First, Break All the Rules: updated meta-analytic research and access to the CliftonStrengths assessment, which reveals people’s top themes of talent.

What separates the greatest managers from all the rest?

They actually have vastly different styles and backgrounds. Yet despite their differences, great managers share one common trait: They don’t hesitate to break virtually every rule held sacred by conventional wisdom. They don’t believe that, with enough training, a person can achieve anything they set their mind to. They don’t try to help people overcome their weaknesses. And, yes, they even play favorites.

In this longtime management bestseller, Gallup presents the remarkable findings of its massive in-depth study of great managers. Some were in leadership positions. Others were front-line supervisors. Some were in Fortune 500 companies; others were key players in small, entrepreneurial firms. Whatever their circumstances, the managers who ultimately became the focus of Gallup’s research were those who excelled at turning each individual employee’s talent into high performance.

Gallup has found that the front-line manager is the key to attracting and retaining talented employees. This book explains how the best managers select an employee for talent rather than for skills or experience, set expectations, build on each person’s unique strengths rather than trying to fix their weaknesses, and get the best performance out of their teams.

And perhaps most important, Gallup’s research produced the 12 simple statements that distinguish the strongest departments of a company from all the rest. First, Break All the Rules is the first book to present this essential measuring stick and to prove the link between employee opinions and productivity, profit, customer satisfaction and the rate of turnover.

First, Break All the Rules presents vital performance and career lessons for managers at every level — and best of all, shows you how to apply them to your own situation.

59. Fix This Next by Mike Michalowicz

The biggest problem entrepreneurs have is that they don’t know what their biggest problem is. If you find yourself trapped between stagnating sales, staff turnover, and unhappy customers, what do you fix first? Every issue seems urgent — but there’s no way to address all of them at once. The result? A business that continues to go in endless circles putting out urgent fires and prioritizing the wrong things.

Fortunately, Mike Michalowicz has a simple system to help you eradicate these frustrations and get your business moving forward, fast. Mike himself has lived through the struggles and countless distractions of entrepreneurship, and devoted years to finding a simple way to pinpoint exactly where to direct attention for rapid growth. He figured out that every business has a hierarchy of needs, and if you can understand where you are in that hierarchy, you can identify what needs immediate attention. Simply fix that one thing next, and your business will naturally and effortlessly level-up.

Over the past decade, Mike has developed an ardent following for his funny, honest, and actionable insights told through the stories of real entrepreneurs. Now, Fix This Next offers a simple, unique, and wildly powerful business compass that has already helped hundreds of companies get to the next level, and will do the same for you. Immediately.

60. Founded After 40 by Glenda Shawley

Founded After Forty by small business expert Glenda Shawley takes you step by step from discovering your ‘why’ and vision to launching your business and keeping the momentum going. It covers finding the right business model and business fundamentals as well as practical considerations such as making the time for running a business.

Part 2 looks at the mechanics of starting up: legal considerations, identifying the target market, choosing the right route to market, developing the brand, making a profit, and mapping the customer journey.

Part 3 gets you started with marketing, staffing, managing the business and the launch and beyond.

The guidance in the book is supplemented with examples from existing business owners who didn’t always get it right first time. Each chapter finished with topics to think about as well as key actions that need to be taken.

There is an accompanying downloadable workbook which builds on the key activities in the book to help you create your own unique business plan.

61. Founders at Work by Jessica Livingston

Now available in paperback—with a new preface and interview with Jessica Livingston about Y Combinator!

Founders at Work: Stories of Startups’ Early Days is a collection of interviews with founders of famous technology companies about what happened in the very earliest days. These people are celebrities now. What was it like when they were just a couple friends with an idea? Founders like Steve Wozniak (Apple), Caterina Fake (Flickr), Mitch Kapor (Lotus), Max Levchin (PayPal), and Sabeer Bhatia (Hotmail) tell you in their own words about their surprising and often very funny discoveries as they learned how to build a company.

Where did they get the ideas that made them rich? How did they convince investors to back them? What went wrong, and how did they recover?

Nearly all technical people have thought of one day starting or working for a startup. For them, this book is the closest you can come to being a fly on the wall at a successful startup, to learn how it’s done.

But ultimately these interviews are required reading for anyone who wants to understand business, because startups are business reduced to its essence. The reason their founders become rich is that startups do what businesses do—create value—more intensively than almost any other part of the economy. How? What are the secrets that make successful startups so insanely productive? Read this book, and let the founders themselves tell you.

62. Franchise Your Business by Mark Siebert

Expert franchise consultant Mark Siebert delivers the ultimate how-to guide to employing the greatest growth strategy ever—franchising. Siebert tells you what to expect, how to move forward, and avoid costly mistakes as he imparts decades of experience, insights, and practical advice to help grow your business exponentially through franchising.

Learn how to:

  • Evaluate your existing businesses for franchisability
  • Identify the advantages and disadvantages of franchising
  • Develop a business plan for growth on steroids
  • Evaluate legal risk, obtain necessary documents, and protect intellectual property
  • Create marketing plans, build lead generation, and branding for a new franchise
  • Cultivate the franchisee-franchisor relationship

63. Getting Real by Jason Fried

Getting Real details the business, design, programming, and marketing principles of 37signals. The book is packed with keep-it-simple insights, contrarian points of view, and unconventional approaches to software design. This is not a technical book or a design tutorial, it’s a book of ideas. 

Anyone working on a web app — including entrepreneurs, designers, programmers, executives, or marketers — will find value and inspiration in this book. 37signals used the Getting Real process to launch five successful web-based applications (Basecamp, Campfire, Backpack, Writeboard, Ta-da List), and Ruby on Rails, an open-source web application framework, in just two years with no outside funding, no debt, and only 7 people (distributed across 7 time zones). Over 500,000 people around the world use these applications to get things done. Now you can find out how they did it and how you can do it too. It’s not as hard as you think if you Get Real.

64. Good Strategy, Bad Strategy by Richard Rumelt

Good Strategy/Bad Strategy clarifies the muddled thinking underlying too many strategies and provides a clear way to create and implement a powerful action-oriented strategy for the real world.

Developing and implementing a strategy is the central task of a leader. A good strategy is a specific and coherent response to – and approach for – overcoming the obstacles to progress. A good strategy works by harnessing and applying power where it will have the greatest effect. Yet, Rumelt shows that there has been a growing and unfortunate tendency to equate Mom-and-apple-pie values, fluffy packages of buzzwords, motivational slogans, and financial goals with “strategy”.

In Good Strategy/Bad Strategy, he debunks these elements of “bad strategy” and awakens an understanding of the power of a “good strategy”. He introduces nine sources of power – ranging from using leverage to effectively focusing on growth – that are eye-opening yet pragmatic tools that can easily be put to work on Monday morning and uses fascinating examples from business, nonprofit, and military affairs to bring its original and pragmatic ideas to life. The detailed examples range from Apple to General Motors, from the two Iraq wars to Afghanistan, from a small local market to Wal-Mart, from Nvidia to Silicon Graphics, from the Getty Trust to the Los Angeles Unified School District, from Cisco Systems to Paccar, and from Global Crossing to the 2007-08 financial crisis.

Reflecting an astonishing grasp and integration of economics, finance, technology, history, and the brilliance and foibles of the human character, Good Strategy/Bad Strategy stems from Rumelt’s decades of digging beyond the superficial to address hard questions with honesty and integrity.

65. Great Work by David Sturt

Great work lives inside all of us.

The question is: Do we make the contributions we’re capable of? Is our best work getting out there? Breaking through? Creating a difference the world loves?

We’ve long been told our ability to succeed depends on our IQ, talent, education level, gender, job title, or when and where we were born. Great Work turns that conventional thinking on its head to reveal that innovation can come from anyone, anywhere.

Especially you.

With insights from the largest-ever study of award-winning work, Great Work reveals five practical skills that will help you ideate, innovate, and deliver work that gets noticed and appreciated.

Great Work is filled with stories of real people in real jobs who did what was asked and then added something extra–a personal touch all their own–to deliver better-than-asked-for results. Their stories will inspire you to write your own page in the book of human progress.

66. Grit to Great by Linda Kaplan Thaler

It is not native intelligence or natural talent that makes people excel, it’s old-fashioned hard work, sweat equity, and determination.

In Grit to Great, Linda Kaplan Thaler and Robin Koval tackle a topic that is close to their hearts, one that they feel is the real secret to their own success in their careers–and in the careers of so many people they know and have met. And that is the incredible power of grit, perseverance, perspiration, determination, and sheer stick-to-it-tiveness.

We are all dazzled by the notion that there are some people who get ahead, who reach the corner office because they are simply gifted, or well-connected, or both. But research shows that we far overvalue talent and intellectual ability in our culture. The fact is, so many people get ahead–even the gifted ones–because they worked incredibly hard, put in the thousands of hours of practice and extra sweat equity, and made their own luck. And Linda and Robin should know–they are two girls from the Bronx who had no special advantages or privileges and rose up through their own hard work and relentless drive to succeed to the top of their highly competitive profession. 

In a book illustrated with a cornucopia of stories and the latest research on success, the authors reveal the strategies that helped them, and countless others, succeed at the highest levels in their careers and professions, and in their personal lives. They talk about the guts–the courage–necessary to take on tough challenges and not give up at the first sign of difficulty. They discuss the essential quality of resiliency. Everyone suffers setbacks in their careers and in life. The key, however, is to pick yourself up and bounce back. 

Drawing on the latest research in positive psychology, they discuss why optimists do better in school, work, and on the playing field–and how to reset that optimistic set point. They talk about industriousness, the notion that Malcolm Gladwell popularized with the 10,000-hour rule in his book Outliers. Creativity theorist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi believes it takes a minimum of 10 years for one’s true creative potential to be realized. And the authors explore the concept of tenacity–the quality that allows us to remain focused and avoid distraction in order to get the job done–an increasingly difficult task in today’s fragmented, cluttered, high-tech, connected world.

Written in the same short, concise format as The Power of Nice and leavened with the natural humor that characterizes Linda’s and Robin’s lives–and books–Grit to Great is destined to be the book everyone in business needs.

67. Gutenberg the Geek by Jeff Jarvis

Johannes Gutenberg was our first geek, the original technology entrepreneur, who had to grapple with all the challenges a Silicon Valley startup faces today. Jeff Jarvis tells Gutenberg’s story from an entrepreneurial perspective, examining how he overcame technology hurdles, how he operated with the secrecy of a Steve Jobs but then shifted to openness, how he raised capital and mitigated risk, and how, in the end, his cash flow and equity structure did him in. This is also the inspiring story of a great disruptor. That is what makes Gutenberg the patron saint of entrepreneurs.

Jeff Jarvis is the author of “Public Parts: How Sharing in the Digital Age Improves the Way We Work and Live” and “What Would Google Do?: Reverse-Engineering the Fastest Growing Company in the History of the World.” He directs the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism.

68. Hackers and Painters by Paul Graham

“The computer world is like an intellectual Wild West, in which you can shoot anyone you wish with your ideas, if you’re willing to risk the consequences. ” –from Hackers & Painters: Big Ideas from the Computer Age, by Paul Graham

We are living in the computer age, in a world increasingly designed and engineered by computer programmers and software designers, by people who call themselves hackers. Who are these people, what motivates them, and why should you care?

Consider these facts: Everything around us is turning into computers. Your typewriter is gone, replaced by a computer. Your phone has turned into a computer. So has your camera. Soon your TV will. Your car was not only designed on computers, but has more processing power in it than a room-sized mainframe did in 1970. Letters, encyclopedias, newspapers, and even your local store are being replaced by the Internet.

Hackers & Painters: Big Ideas from the Computer Age, by Paul Graham, explains this world and the motivations of the people who occupy it. In clear, thoughtful prose that draws on illuminating historical examples, Graham takes readers on an unflinching exploration into what he calls “an intellectual Wild West.”

The ideas discussed in this book will have a powerful and lasting impact on how we think, how we work, how we develop technology, and how we live. Topics include the importance of beauty in software design, how to make wealth, heresy and free speech, the programming language renaissance, the open-source movement, digital design, internet startups, and more.

69. Hopping over the Rabbit Hole by Anthony Scaramucci

Develop the Scaramucci mindset that drives entrepreneurial success

Hopping over the Rabbit Hole chronicles the rise, fall, and resurgence of SkyBridge Capital founder Anthony Scaramucci, giving you a primer on how to thrive in an unpredictable business environment. The sheer number of American success stories has created a false impression that becoming an entrepreneur is a can’t-miss endeavor—but nothing could be further from the truth. In the real world, an entrepreneur batting .150 goes directly to the Hall of Fame. Things happen. You make a bad hire, a bad strategic decision, or suffer the consequences of an unforeseen market crash. You can’t control what happens to your business, but you can absolutely control how you react, and how you turn bumps in the road into ramps to the sky. Anthony Scaramucci has been there and done that, again and again, and has ultimately come out on top; in this book, he shares what he wishes he knew then.

Your chances of becoming an overnight billionaire are approximately the same as your chances of being signed to the NBA. Success is hard work, and anxiety, and tiny hiccups that can turn into disaster with a single misstep. This book shows you how to use adversity to your ultimate advantage, and build the skills you need to respond effectively to the unexpected.

  • Learn how to deal with unforeseen events
  • Map a strategic backup plan, and then a backup-backup plan
  • Train yourself to react in the most productive way
  • Internalize the lessons learned by a leader in entrepreneurship

For every 23-year-old billionaire who just created a new way to send a picture on a phone, there are countless others who have failed, and failed miserably. Hopping over the Rabbit Hole gives you the skills, insight, and mindset you need to be one of the winners.

70. How to Have a Happy Hustle by Bec Evans

How to Have a Happy Hustle shares the secrets of innovation experts and startup founders to help you make your ideas happen.

If you’re looking for fulfilment outside the day job, have an idea but don’t know where to start, or are held back by a lack of confidence, experience, time or money, Bec Evans will help you get off the starting blocks with this complete guide to making your ideas happen.

There’s no getting away from it – hustling is hard work – but with practical tools, inspiring stories, science-backed research and guidance every step of the way, you’ll find what makes you happy as you build your side hustle.

71. How to Prepare a Business Plan by Edward Blackwell

An excellent business plan impresses financial backers, provides a clear blueprint for the future of your company and functions as a benchmark against which to measure future growth. How to Prepare a Business Plan explains the process of creating an excellent business plan in an engaging and accessible way. It includes essential coverage of producing cash flow forecasts, planning a business expansion, planning your borrowing and monitoring business progress.

Global case studies containing real business plans provide inspiration and real-life practical insight by analyzing the plans, monitoring the business’ progress and discussing their problems. Sample business plans also show you the process in action and provide useful examples for creating your own. How to Prepare a Business Plan helps new business owners to consider what they really want out of their business, and to map their own journey and gain a new understanding of their product’s place in the market, as well as writing a business plan with the clarity, brevity and logic to keep bank managers interested and convinced.

Whether looking to start up or expand, this practical advice will help anyone to prepare a plan that is tailored to the requirements of their business – one that will get the financial backing they need.

72. How to Start a Start-up by ThinkApps

New startups are created every day around the word, with many founders dreaming of millions of users and billions of dollars. But the harsh reality is that very few will succeed.

How can entrepreneurs stack the odds in their favor? By learning from the experiences of startup founders, executives, and investors who’ve been there before.

That’s exactly what “How to Start a Startup” provides, sharing essential lessons from 25+ Silicon Valley insiders who’ve faced the challenges of starting a new business and come out swinging.

Based on a Stanford University course taught by Y Combinator (the prestigious startup accelerator behind companies like Dropbox and Airbnb), this in-depth reference guide features advice from experts like:

  • Reid Hoffman, LinkedIn co-founder
  • Dustin Moskovitz, Facebook co-founder
  • Paul Graham, Y Combinator co-founder
  • Marc Andreessen and Ben Horowitz, co-founders of Netscape and Andreessen Horowitz venture capital firm
  • Peter Thiel, co-founder of PayPal and Founders Fund, early Facebook investor
  • Ben Silbermann, Pinterest co-founder and CEO

Nominated as “Book of the Year” by Product Hunt (the leading Silicon Valley community for discovering the best new products), “How to Start a Startup” reveals the secrets to raising money, building products users love, hiring a great team, getting press coverage, attracting customers, growing your business, and more.

No matter what type of product you’re creating (web, mobile, hardware, online-to-offline, etc.) or what audience you’re targeting (consumers or the enterprise), this playbook will give you all the information necessary to launch and scale a successful startup.

This book was created independently by the publishers and all net proceeds will go to support charitable causes promoting wider access to opportunity for all.

73. Human/Machine by Daniel Newman

Will the workplace of the future be overrun by machines and robots? Are the new frontiers of artificial intelligence (AI) on the cusp of dethroning us in efficiency, intelligence and innovative potential? Automation and AI will augment our human world and potential. The winners of the future of work are those that harness the power of machines to their advantage. Human/Machine is the only guide you need to understand the fourth industrial revolution. It sets out a road map to the challenges ahead, but also unlocks the wondrous opportunities that it offers.

Human/Machine explores how we will work symbiotically with machines, detailing how institutions, companies, individuals and education providers will evolve to integrate seamlessly with new technologies. With exclusive case studies, this book offers a glimpse into the future and details how top companies are already thriving on this very special relationship. From gamification in job training to project management teams integrated with bots and predictive technologies that fix problems in the supply chain before they happen, the authors deliver a powerful manifesto for the adoption and celebration of automation and AI. In a much more fluid, skills-based economy, we will all need to prove our worth and future-proof our skills base. This book offers a blueprint to avoid being left behind and unearth the opportunities unique to human-machine partnership ecosystems.

74. Hustle by Neil Patel

A New York Times, Los Angeles Times, USA Today, and IndieBound best seller that Fortune says is a must-listen for any entrepreneur!

Too often we feel like underdogs fighting a system that stacks the odds against us. We work hard, follow the rules, and dream of a better life. But these days, working harder doesn’t always lead to fulfillment. In fact, according to Gallup research, nearly 90% of people feel disconnected from their jobs. So how do you break free from the drudgery and achieve more success on your own terms?

You hustle.

The secret lies in making manageable tweaks and placing small bets on pursuits that propel you from who you are today to the person you’re destined to become.

In Hustle, Neil Patel, Patrick Vlaskovits, and Jonas Koffler – three of the nation’s top entrepreneurs and consultants – have teamed up to teach you how to look at work and life through a new lens – one based on discovering projects you enjoy and the people and opportunities that support your talents, growth, income, and happiness.

The authors reveal their groundbreaking three-part framework of Heart, Head, and Habits. Along the way, you will learn to redefine hustle as the optimal path to success using powerful, often counterintuitive, advice, including:

  • Why you must own your dreams, not rent dreams from others
  • Ways to create your own luck and “POP”
  • How to betray yourself to stay true to yourself – and develop your potential
  • The four major career hustles and the path that’s best for you

More than just an inspirational career guide, Hustle aims to fundamentally transform the way you work and live, and give yourself permission to thrive in today’s uncertain world.

75. Idea to Execution by Ari Meisel

Please download the supplementary PDF for a list of the figures referenced in the audio.

When Ari Meisel and Nick Sonnenberg launched their high-end virtual assistant (VA) company, Less Doing, they changed the culture of start-ups forever, effectively debunking the gospel that every new venture requires months of preplanning and a hefty investment of capital. A business born from scribbled notes on a cocktail napkin during dinner was an up-and-running concern less than 24 hours later, ingeniously brought to life with the help of free, readily available digital tools and apps and no outlay of cash whatsoever.

Meisel and Sonnenberg reveal how a scalable start-up is done to perfection in this fascinating and informative chronicle of their first year in business together. An essential listen for any budding entrepreneur, it follows the creative commercial process from inspiration to inception to success, detailing a bold new approach to 21st century business based on a fearless ingenuity and a willingness to rewrite the rules.

76. Imagine It Forward by Beth Comstock

From one of today’s foremost innovation leaders, an inspiring, personal approach to mastering change in the face of uncertainty.

Named a 2018 Best Business Book Pick by Fast Company and Wired UK.

Confronting change is incredibly hard, both organizationally and personally. People become resistant. They are afraid. Yet the pace of change in our world will never be slower than it is right now, says Beth Comstock, the former vice chair and head of marketing and innovation at GE.

Imagine It Forward is an inspiring, fresh, candid, and deeply personal audiobook about how to grapple with the challenges to change we face every day. It is a different kind of narrative, a big-picture audiobook that combines Comstock’s personal story in leading change with vital lessons on overcoming the inevitable roadblocks. One of the most successful women in business, Comstock shares her own transformation story from introverted publicist to GE’s first woman vice chair and her hard-won lessons in shifting GE, a 125-year-old American institution, toward a new digital future and a more innovative culture.  

As the woman who initiated GE’s Ecomagination clean-energy and its (and NBC’s) digital transformations, Comstock challenged a global organization to not wait for perfection, but to seek out emerging trends, embrace smart risks, and test ideas boldly and often. She shows how each one of us can become a “change maker” by leading with imagination.   

“Ideas are rarely the problem,” writes Comstock. “What holds all of us back, really – is fear. It’s the attachment to the old, to ‘What We Know.’”

As Comstock makes clear, transforming the mind-set and culture of a company is messy. There is no easy checklist. It is fraught with uncertainty, tension, and too often, failure. It calls for the courage to defy convention, go around corporate gatekeepers when necessary, and reinvent what is possible.

For all those looking to spearhead change in their companies and careers and reinvent “the way things are done”, Imagine It Forward masterfully points the way.

77. Imperfect Courage by Jessica Honegger

Want to make a move but scared to leave your comfort zone? Go anyway.   

“Jessica’s perspective of global sisterhood and the power of lifting each other up in the midst of fear and scarcity is exactly what we need today. This book is both an invitation and a challenge to bravely show up for ourselves, for the people we love, and for the strangers that we will one day call family. I say, Amen!” (Brené Brown, PhD, author of the number-one New York Times best-seller Braving the Wilderness)

In Imperfect Courage, the founder of the popular fair trade jewelry brand Noonday Collection shares her story of starting the rapid-growing business that impacts over 4,500 artisans in vulnerable communities across the globe – and invites listeners on a journey of transformation, challenging them to trade their comfort zones for a life of impact and adventure. In 2015, Inc. magazine recognized Noonday Collection as one of the fastest-growing companies in America. But years earlier, as Jessica Honegger stood at a pawn-shop counter in Austin, Texas, and handed over her grandmother’s gold jewelry, her goal was much more personal: to fund the adoption of her Rwandan son, Jack, by selling artisan-made jewelry.    

This first step launched an unexpected side-hustle that would grow into Noonday Collection. Jessica embarked on this new journey and teamed up with her first artisan partner, Jalia, a Ugandan jewelry maker. She saw the meaningful impact Noonday brought to Jalia’s community and knew it was the right move.   

Fear crept into Jessica’s heart as she realized her success, or failure, meant the same for Jalia. But refusing to let fear hinder her goals, Jessica found the necessary (if imperfect) courage she needed along the way – the courage to leave comfort and embrace a life of risk and impact. 

Discover Your Imperfect Courage 

In Imperfect Courage, Jessica takes you by the hand and invites you to trade your comfort zone for a life of impact and meaning.

  • First, she invites you to draw a circle of compassion around yourself and leads you through some soul-searching aimed at setting you free from shame.
  • Next, she challenges all of us to come together, dare to be vulnerable with one another, and commit to building a culture of collaboration.
  • Finally, Jessica calls on you to broaden your circle of compassion to embrace the entire globe – and to bring your beautifully imperfect courage to a world that needs you.

78. Innovating Women by Vivek Wadhwa

Women in technology are on the rise in both power and numbers, and now it’s more important than ever to not lose that momentum, to “lean in” and close the gender gap. Although they make up half of the population, only 14% of engineers in the United States are women. They take the seeds of technological advancement and build something life-changing, potentially life-saving. The future of technology depends on the full and active participation of women and men working together, and it is vital that women are both educated and encouraged to go into the tech sectors.

Hailed by Foreign Policy Magazine as a “Top 100 Global Thinker,” professor, researcher, and entrepreneur Vivek Wadhwa, alongside award-winning journalist Farai Chideya, set out to collect anecdotes and essays from global leaders, sharing how their experiences in innovative industries frame the future of entrepreneurship. With interviews and essays from hundreds of women in STEM fields, including Anousheh Ansari the first female private sector space explorer, former Google[X] VP and current CTO of the USA Megan Smith, Ory Okolloh of the Omidyar Network, venture capitalist Heidi Roizen and CEO of Nanobiosym Dr. Anita Goel, MD, PhD, Innovating Women offers perspectives on the challenges that women face, the strategies that they employ in the workplace, and how an organization can succeed or fail in its attempts to support the career advancement of women.

79. Innovation and Entrepreneurship by Peter Drucker

Peter Drucker’s classic book on innovation and entrepreneurship

This is the first book to present innovation and entrepreneurship as a purposeful and systematic discipline that explains and analyzes the challenges and opportunities of America’s new entrepreneurial economy. Superbly practical, Innovation and Entrepreneurship explains what established businesses, public service institutions, and new ventures need to know and do to succeed in today’s economy.

80. Insanely Simple by Ken Segall

To Steve Jobs, Simplicity was a religion. It was also a weapon. Simplicity isn’t just a design principle at Apple—it’s a value that permeates every level of the organization. 

The obsession with Simplicity is what separates Apple from other technology companies. It’s what helped Apple recover from near death in 1997 to become the most valuable company on Earth in 2011. Thanks to Steve Jobs’s uncompromising ways, you can see Simplicity in everything Apple does: the way it’s structured, the way it innovates, and the way it speaks to its customers. It’s by crushing the forces of Complexity that the company remains on its stellar trajectory. 

As ad agency creative director, Ken Segall played a key role in Apple’s resurrection, helping to create such critical marketing campaigns as Think different. 

By naming the iMac, he also laid the foundation for naming waves of i-products to come. Segall has a unique perspective, given his years of experience creating campaigns for other iconic tech companies, including IBM, Intel, and Dell. It was the stark contrast of Apple’s ways that made Segall appreciate the power of Simplicity—and inspired him to help others benefit from it. 

In Insanely Simple, you’ll be a fly on the wall inside a conference room with Steve Jobs, and on the receiving end of his midnight phone calls. You’ll understand how his obsession with Simplicity helped Apple perform better and faster, sometimes saving millions in the process. You’ll also learn, for example, how to:

  • Think Minimal: Distilling choices to a minimum brings clarity to a company and its customers—as Jobs proved when he replaced over twenty product models with a lineup of four.
  • Think Small: Swearing allegiance to the concept of “small groups of smart people” raises both morale and productivity.
  • Think Motion: Keeping project teams in constant motion focuses creative thinking on well-defined goals and minimizes distractions.
  • Think Iconic: Using a simple, powerful image to symbolize the benefit of a product or idea creates a deeper impression in the minds of customers.
  • Think War: Giving yourself an unfair advantage—using every weapon at your disposal—is the best way to ensure that your ideas survive unscathed.Segall brings Apple’s quest for Simplicity to life using fascinating (and previously untold) stories from behind the scenes. Through his insight and wit, you’ll discover how companies that leverage this power can stand out from competitors—and individuals who master it can become critical assets to their organizations.

81. Inspired by Marty Cagan

How do today’s most successful tech companies—Amazon, Google, Facebook, Netflix, Tesla—design, develop, and deploy the products that have earned the love of literally billions of people around the world?

Perhaps surprisingly, they do it very differently than most tech companies.

In INSPIRED, technology product management thought leader Marty Cagan provides readers with a master class in how to structure and staff a vibrant and successful product organization, and how to discover and deliver technology products that your customers will love—and that will work for your business.

With sections on assembling the right people and skillsets, discovering the right product, embracing an effective yet lightweight process, and creating a strong product culture, readers can take the information they learn and immediately leverage it within their own organizations—dramatically improving their own product efforts. 

Whether you’re an early stage startup working to get to product/market fit, or a growth-stage company working to scale your product organization, or a large, long-established company trying to regain your ability to consistently deliver new value for your customers, INSPIRED will take you and your product organization to a new level of customer engagement, consistent innovation, and business success. 

Filled with the author’s own personal stories—and profiles of some of today’s most-successful product managers and technology-powered product companies, including Adobe, Apple, BBC, Google, Microsoft, and Netflix—INSPIRED will show you how to turn up the dial of your own product efforts, creating technology products your customers love. 

The first edition of INSPIRED, published ten years ago, established itself as the primary reference for technology product managers, and can be found on the shelves of nearly every successful technology product company worldwide. This thoroughly updated second edition shares the same objective of being the most valuable resource for technology product managers, yet it is completely new—sharing the latest practices and techniques of today’s most-successful tech product companies, and the men and women behind every great product.

82. Inventology by Pagan Kennedy

A father cleans up after his toddler and imagines a cup that won’t spill. An engineer watches people using walkie-talkies and has an idea. A doctor figures out how to deliver patients to the operating room before they die.

By studying inventions like these—the sippy cup, the cell phone, and an ingenious hospital bed —we can learn how people imagine their way around “impossible” problems to discover groundbreaking answers. Pagan Kennedy reports on how these enduring methods can be adapted to the twenty-first century, as millions of us deploy tools like crowdfunding, big data, and 3-D printing to find hidden opportunities.

Inventology uses the stories of inventors and surprising research to reveal the steps that produce innovation. Recent advances in technology and communication have placed us at the cusp of a golden age; it’s now more possible than ever before to transform ideas into actuality. Inventology is a must-read for designers, artists, makers—and anyone else who is curious about creativity. By identifying the steps of the invention process, Kennedy reveals the imaginative tools required to solve our most challenging problems.

83. Lean Analytics by Alistair Croll

Marc Andreesen once said that “markets that don’t exist don’t care how smart you are.” Whether you’re a startup founder trying to disrupt an industry, or an intrapreneur trying to provoke change from within, your biggest risk is building something nobody wants.

Lean Analytics can help. By measuring and analyzing as you grow, you can validate whether a problem is real, find the right customers, and decide what to build, how to monetize it, and how to spread the word. Focusing on the One Metric That Matters to your business right now gives you the focus you need to move ahead–and the discipline to know when to change course.

Written by Alistair Croll (Coradiant, CloudOps, Startupfest) and Ben Yoskovitz (Year One Labs, GoInstant), the book lays out practical, proven steps to take your startup from initial idea to product/market fit and beyond. Packed with over 30 case studies, and based on a year of interviews with over a hundred founders and investors, the book is an invaluable, practical guide for Lean Startup practitioners everywhere.

84. Lean UX by Jeff Gothelf

Lean UX is synonymous with modern product design and development. By combining human-centric design, agile ways of working, and a strong business sense, designers, product managers, developers, and scrum masters around the world are making Lean UX the leading approach for digital product teams today.

In the third edition of this award-winning book, authors Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden help you focus on the product experience rather than deliverables. You’ll learn tactics for integrating user experience design, product discovery, agile methods, and product management. And you’ll discover how to drive your design in short, iterative cycles to assess what works best for businesses and users. Lean UX guides you through this change–for the better.

  • Facilitate the Lean UX process with your team with the Lean UX Canvas
  • Ensure every project starts with clear customer-centric success criteria
  • Understand the role of designer on a agile team
  • Write and contribute design and experiment stories to the backlog
  • Ensure that design work takes place in every sprint
  • Build product discovery into your team’s “velocity”

85. Lessons from the Titans by Scott Davis

Before Silicon Valley disrupted the world with new technologies and business models, America’s industrial giants paved the way. Companies like General Electric, United Technologies, and Caterpillar were the Google and Amazon of their day, setting gold standards in innovation, growth, and profitability. Today’s leaders can learn a great deal from their successes, as well as their missteps. In this essential guide, three veteran Wall Street analysts reveal timeless lessons from the titans of industry—and offer battle-tested survival tactics for an ever-changing world. You’ll learn:

  • how GE became the largest company on earth—only for a culture of arrogance to set in motion the largest collapse in history
  • how Boeing reassessed risks, raised profits—and tragically lost its balance
  • how Danaher avoided the pitfalls of tremendous success—by continually reinventing itself
  • how Honeywell experienced a near-fatal cultural breakdown—and executed a flawless turnaround
  • how Caterpillar relied too much on forecasting, lost billions—and rallied by recommitting to the basics

Filled with illuminating case studies and brilliant in-depth analysis, this invaluable book provides a multitude of insights that will help you weather market upheavals, adapt to disruptions, and optimize your resources to your best advantage. You’ll learn hard-won lessons in innovation, growth, resilience, and operational excellence, as well as the time-proven fundamentals of continuous improvement for lasting success. In the end, you’ll have your own personal toolbox of useful takeaways from more than a century’s worth of data, experience, wisdom, and can-do spirit, courtesy of some of the greatest business enterprises of all time. This is how manufacturers survived the first disruptors of technology—and how today’s giants can survive and thrive during continuous cycles of disruption.

86. Loonshots by Safi Bahcall

Why do good teams kill great ideas?

Loonshots reveals a surprising new way of thinking about the mysteries of group behavior that challenges everything we thought we knew about nurturing radical breakthroughs.

Bahcall, a physicist and entrepreneur, shows why teams, companies, or any group with a mission will suddenly change from embracing new ideas to rejecting them, just as flowing water will suddenly change into brittle ice. Mountains of print have been written about culture. Loonshots identifies the small shifts in structure that control this transition, the same way that temperature controls the change from water to ice.

Using examples that range from the spread of fires in forests to the hunt for terrorists online, and stories of thieves and geniuses and kings, Bahcall shows how a new kind of science can help us become the initiators, rather than the victims, of innovative surprise.

Over the past decade, researchers have been applying the tools and techniques of this new science—the science of phase transitions—to understand how birds flock, fish swim, brains work, people vote, diseases erupt, and ecosystems collapse. Loonshots is the first to apply this science to the spread of breakthrough ideas. Bahcall distills these insights into practical lessons creatives, entrepreneurs, and visionaries can use to change our world.

Along the way, readers will learn how chickens saved millions of lives, what James Bond and Lipitor have in common, what the movie Imitation Game got wrong about WWII, and what really killed Pan Am, Polaroid, and the Qing Dynasty.

87. Lost and Founder by Rand Fishkin

Everyone knows how a startup story is supposed to go: A young, brilliant entrepreneur has a cool idea, drops out of college, defies the doubters, overcomes all odds, makes billions, and becomes the envy of the technology world.

This is not that story.

It’s not that things went badly for Rand Fishkin; they just weren’t quite so Zuckerberg-esque. His company, Moz, maker of marketing software, is now a $45 million/year business, and he’s one of the world’s leading experts on SEO. But his business and reputation took fifteen years to grow, and his startup began not in a Harvard dorm room but as a mother-and-son family business that fell deeply into debt.

Now Fishkin pulls back the curtain on tech startup mythology, exposing the ups and downs of startup life that most CEOs would rather keep secret. For instance: A minimally viable product can be destructive if you launch at the wrong moment. Growth hacking may be the buzzword du jour, but initiatives can fizzle quickly. Revenue and growth won’t protect you from layoffs. And venture capital always comes with strings attached.

Fishkin’s hard-won lessons are applicable to any kind of business environment. Up or down the chain of command, at both early stage startups and mature companies, whether your trajectory is riding high or down in the dumps: this book can help solve your problems, and make you feel less alone for having them.

88. New to Big by David Kidder & Christina Wallace

Most established companies face a key survival challenge, says David Kidder, CEO of Bionic, lifelong entrepreneur, and angel investor in more than thirty startups: operational efficiency and outdated bureaucracy are at war with new growth. Legacy companies are skilled at growing big businesses into even bigger ones. But they are less adept at discovering new opportunities and turning them into big businesses, the way entrepreneurs and early-stage investors must. In New to Big, Kidder and Wallace reveal their proprietary blueprint for installing a permanent growth capability inside any company–the Growth Operating System.

The Growth OS borrows the best tools, systems, and mind-sets from entrepreneurship and venture capital and adapts them for established organizations, leveraging these two distinct skills as a form of management for building in a future that is uncertain. By focusing on what consumers do rather than what they say, celebrating productive failure, embracing a portfolio approach, and learning from the outside-in, Kidder and Wallace argue any company can go on offense and win the future.

This isn’t about a one-off innovation moonshot. It’s about building a permanent ladder to the moon.

89. Only the Paranoid Survive by Andrew S. Grove

Under Andy Grove’s leadership, Intel became the world’s largest chip maker and one of the most admired companies in the world. In Only the Paranoid Survive, Grove reveals his strategy for measuring the nightmare moment every leader dreads–when massive change occurs and a company must, virtually overnight, adapt or fall by the wayside–in a new way.

Grove calls such a moment a Strategic Inflection Point, which can be set off by almost anything: mega-competition, a change in regulations, or a seemingly modest change in technology. When a Strategic Inflection Point hits, the ordinary rules of business go out the window. Yet, managed right, a Strategic Inflection Point can be an opportunity to win in the marketplace and emerge stronger than ever.

Grove underscores his message by examining his own record of success and failure, including how he navigated the events of the Pentium flaw, which threatened Intel’s reputation in 1994, and how he has dealt with the explosions in growth of the Internet. The work of a lifetime, Only the Paranoid Survive is a classic of managerial and leadership skills.

90. Pitch Anything by Oren Klaff

When it comes to delivering a pitch, Oren Klaff has unparalleled credentials. Over the past 13 years, he has used his one-of-a- kind method to raise more than $400 million—and now, for the first time, he describes his formula to help you deliver a winning pitch in any business situation.

Whether you’re selling ideas to investors, pitching a client for new business, or even negotiating for a higher salary, Pitch Anything will transform the way you position your ideas.

According to Klaff, creating and presenting a great pitch isn’t an art—it’s a simple science. Applying the latest findings in the field of neuroeconomics, while sharing eye-opening stories of his method in action, Klaff describes how the brain makes decisions and responds to pitches. With this information, you’ll remain in complete control of every stage of the pitch process.

Pitch Anything introduces the exclusive STRONG method of pitching, which can be put to use immediately:

  • Setting the Frame
  • Telling the Story
  • Revealing the Intrigue
  • Offering the Prize
  • Nailing the Hookpoint
  • Getting a Decision

One truly great pitch can improve your career, make you a lot of money—and even change your life. Success is dependent on the method you use, not how hard you try. “Better method, more money,” Klaff says. “Much better method, much more money.” Klaff is the best in the business because his method is much better than anyone else’s. And now it’s yours.

Apply the tactics and strategies outlined in Pitch Anything to engage and persuade your audience—and you’ll have more funding and support than you ever thought possible.

91. Play Bigger by Al Ramadan

The founders of a respected Silicon Valley advisory firm study legendary category-creating companies and reveal a groundbreaking discipline called category design.

Winning today isn’t about beating the competition at the old game. It’s about inventing a whole new game—defining a new market category, developing it, and dominating it over time. You can’t build a legendary company without building a legendary category. If you think that having the best product is all it takes to win, you’re going to lose.

In this farsighted, pioneering guide, the founders of Silicon Valley advisory firm Play Bigger rely on data analysis and interviews to understand the inner workings of “category kings”— companies such as Amazon, Salesforce, Uber, and IKEA—that give us new ways of living, thinking or doing business, often solving problems we didn’t know we had.

In Play Bigger, the authors assemble their findings to introduce the new discipline of category design. By applying category design, companies can create new demand where none existed, conditioning customers’ brains so they change their expectations and buying habits. While this discipline defines the tech industry, it applies to every kind of industry and even to personal careers.

Crossing the Chasm revolutionized how we think about new products in an existing market. The Innovator’s Dilemma taught us about disrupting an aging market. Now, Play Bigger is transforming business once again, showing us how to create the market itself.

92. Profit First by Mike Michalowicz

Conventional accounting uses the logical (albeit, flawed) formula: Sales – Expenses = Profit. The problem is, businesses are run by humans, and humans aren’t always logical. Serial entrepreneur Mike Michalowicz has developed a behavioral approach to accounting to flip the formula: Sales – Profit = Expenses. Just as the most effective weight loss strategy is to limit portions by using smaller plates, Michalowicz shows that by taking profit first and apportioning only what remains for expenses, entrepreneurs will transform their businesses from cash-eating monsters to profitable cash cows. Using Michalowicz’s Profit First system, readers will learn that:

  • Following 4 simple principles can simplify accounting and make it easier to manage a profitable business by looking at bank account balances.
  • A small, profitable business can be worth much more than a large business surviving on its top line.
  • Businesses that attain early and sustained profitability have a better shot at achieving long-term growth.

With dozens of case studies, practical, step-by-step advice, and his signature sense of humor, Michalowicz has the game-changing roadmap for any entrepreneur to make money they always dreamed of.

93. Purple Cow by Seth Godin

The cult classic that revolutionized marketing by teaching businesses that you’re either remarkable or invisible.

Few authors have had the kind of lasting impact and global reach that Seth Godin has had. In a series of now-classic books that have been translated into 36 languages and reached millions of readers around the world, he has taught generations of readers how to make remarkable products and spread powerful ideas.

In Purple Cow, first published in 2003 and revised and expanded in 2009, Godin launched a movement to make truly remarkable products that are worth marketing in the first place. Through stories about companies like Starbucks, JetBlue, Krispy Kreme, and Apple, coupled with his signature provocative style, he inspires readers to rethink what their marketing is really saying about their product. In a world that grows noisier by the day, Godin’s challenge has never been more relevant to writers, marketers, advertisers, entrepreneurs, makers, product managers, and anyone else who has something to share with the world.

94. ReWork by Jason Fried

Rework shows you a better, faster, easier way to succeed in business. 

Most business books give you the same old advice: Write a business plan, study the competition, seek investors, yadda yadda. If you’re looking for a book like that, put this one back on the shelf.

Read it and you’ll know why plans are actually harmful, why you don’t need outside investors, and why you’re better off ignoring the competition. The truth is, you need less than you think. You don’t need to be a workaholic. You don’t need to staff up. You don’t need to waste time on paperwork or meetings. You don’t even need an office. Those are all just excuses. 

What you really need to do is stop talking and start working. This book shows you the way. You’ll learn how to be more productive, how to get exposure without breaking the bank, and tons more counterintuitive ideas that will inspire and provoke you.

With its straightforward language and easy-is-better approach, Rework is the perfect playbook for anyone who’s ever dreamed of doing it on their own. Hardcore entrepreneurs, small-business owners, people stuck in day jobs they hate, victims of “downsizing,” and artists who don’t want to starve anymore will all find valuable guidance in these pages.

95. Secrets of Sand Hill Road by Scott Kupor

What are venture capitalists saying about your startup behind closed doors? And what can you do to influence that conversation?

If Silicon Valley is the greatest wealth-generating machine in the world, Sand Hill Road is its humming engine. That’s where you’ll find the biggest names in venture capital, including famed VC firm Andreessen Horowitz, where lawyer-turned-entrepreneur-turned-VC Scott Kupor serves as managing partner.

Whether you’re trying to get a new company off the ground or scale an existing business to the next level, you need to understand how VCs think. In Secrets of Sand Hill Road, Kupor explains exactly how VCs decide where and how much to invest, and how entrepreneurs can get the best possible deal and make the most of their relationships with VCs. Kupor explains, for instance:

  • Why most VCs typically invest in only one startup in a given business category.
  • Why the skill you need most when raising venture capital is the ability to tell a compelling story.
  • How to handle a “down round,” when startups have to raise funds at a lower valuation than in the previous round.
  • What to do when VCs get too entangled in the day-to-day operations of the business.
  • Why you need to build relationships with potential acquirers long before you decide to sell.

Filled with Kupor’s firsthand experiences, insider advice, and practical takeaways, Secrets of Sand Hill Road is the guide every entrepreneur needs to turn their startup into the next unicorn.

96. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Based on more than forty interviews with Steve Jobs conducted over two years—as well as interviews with more than 100 family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues—Walter Isaacson has written a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and searingly intense personality of a creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing.

At a time when America is seeking ways to sustain its innovative edge, Jobs stands as the ultimate icon of inventiveness and applied imagination. He knew that the best way to create value in 21st century was to connect creativity with technology. He built a company where leaps of the imagination were combined with remarkable feats of engineering.

Although Jobs cooperated with the author, he asked for no control over what was written. He put nothing off-limits. He encouraged the people he knew to speak honestly. And Jobs speaks candidly, sometimes brutally so, about the people he worked with and competed against. His friends, foes, and colleagues provide an unvarnished view of the passions, perfectionism, obsessions, artistry, devilry, and compulsion for control that shaped his approach to business and the innovative products that resulted.

Driven by demons, Jobs could drive those around him to fury and despair. But his personality and products were interrelated, just as Apple’s hardware and software tended to be, as if part of an integrated system. His tale is instructive and cautionary, filled with lessons about innovation, character, leadership, and values.

Steve Jobs is the inspiration for the movie of the same name starring Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet, Seth Rogen, and Jeff Daniels, directed by Danny Boyle with a screenplay by Aaron Sorkin.

97. The E-Myth Revisited by Michael E. Gerber

An instant classic, this revised and updated edition of the phenomenal bestseller dispels the myths about starting your own business. Small business consultant and author Michael E. Gerber, with sharp insight gained from years of experience, points out how common assumptions, expectations, and even technical expertise can get in the way of running a successful business.

Gerber walks you through the steps in the life of a business—from entrepreneurial infancy through adolescent growing pains to the mature entrepreneurial perspective: the guiding light of all businesses that succeed—and shows how to apply the lessons of franchising to any business, whether or not it is a franchise. Most importantly, Gerber draws the vital, often overlooked distinction between working on your business and working in your business.

The E-Myth Revisited will help you grow your business in a productive, assured way.

98. The End of Jobs by Taylor Pearson

The rapid development of technology and globalization has changed the leverage points in accumulating wealth: money, meaning and freedom.

Those that don’t adapt are becoming trapped in the downward spiral of a dying middle class – working harder and earning less.

Entrepreneurs that understand the new paradigm, have created unprecedented wealth in their lives and the lives of those they love.

The End of Jobs combines the broad history of a Sapiens, the latest science of a Thinking Fast and Slow, the entrepreneurial oomph of a Rich Dad, Poor Dad or Zero to One with the motivational push of a Tony Robbins.

In This Book You’ll Learn:

  • Why the century-long growth in wages came to a halt in 2000.
  • Why MBAs and JDs can’t get jobs and what that means for the future of work and your job.
  • Why The Theory of Constraints and a shift into the Fourth Economy has made entrepreneurship the highest-leveraged career path for the young and ambitious.
  • Why The Turkey Problem means accounting may be the riskiest profession in the 21st century while entrepreneurship may be the safest.
  • How entrepreneurs with second-rate degrees are leveraging the radical democracy of the Long Tail to get rich.
  • How the Stair Step Method and return of apprenticeships have transformed the “entrepreneurial leap” to make entrepreneurship at large, and small business entrepreneurship in particular, more accessible than ever.
  • The scientific research on how giving up balanced living and embracing integrated living leads to more money, more meaning, and more freedom.
  • Why a 20th century world view to career search questions like “What career is right for me?” and “How do I find a career?” could be the source of your frustration (and a better way to think about it)

99. The Fixer By Bradley Tusk

Most new startups today are in highly regulated industries with strong incumbents – transportation, hotels, drones, energy, gaming, education, health care, cannabis, finance, liquor, insurance. The more startups try to snatch a piece of the establishment’s pie, the more they risk running into a political wall. That’s where Bradley Tusk comes in.

Described as “Silicon Valley’s Political Savior” (Fast Company) “Uber’s Political Genius” (Vanity Fair) and “Silicon Valley’s Favorite Fixer” (TechCrunch) Tusk deploys the skills and knowledge he developed working with Chuck Schumer, Michael Bloomberg, Rod Blagojevich, and other political and business legends to help startups fight back. This book goes behind the scenes on how he helped stop the taxi industry from killing Uber in its infancy, how he held insurance companies at bay while startup Lemonade launched in each state, and how he helped online sports betting sites FanDuel and Draft Kings escape the regulatory death grip casinos tried to put on them.

As Tusk writes, “Every new company is essentially a tech startup. And when you disrupt someone in any industry, they don’t say thank you. They punch you in the nose. These are the lessons startups need to learn to punch back and survive the clutches of politics.” Combining a firsthand glimpse behind the curtain with tangible advice for how any new venture can play the political game, THE FIXER is a must-read for aspiring entrepreneurs.

100. The Grid By Matt Watkinson

This ground-breaking book from award-winning author Matt Watkinson reveals the fundamental, inseparable elements behind the success of every business.The Grid provides the mental scaffolding to help you:· 

Evaluate and refine product and service ideas· Reduce risk by considering the broader impact of strategic decisions· Identify the root causes behind business challenges· 

Anticipate the impact of changes in the market and turn them to your advantage· Collaborate more effectively across teamsCombining practical guidance with real-world examples, The Grid will bring clarity and confidence to your business decision-making.

101. The Hero Factor by Jeffrey Hayzlett

Today’s leaders need to engage, connect with, listen to and include their employees and customers in the conversation surrounding the business. The Hero Factor discusses the importance of a strong company culture as the backbone of any successful business. Companies with leadership that dismisses the importance of transparency in today’s world are more likely to be called out for not living up to the mission statements on their websites.

Dive in and learn how to implement the traits that will help them become a hero entrepreneur, change their organization, live their values, and create a winning culture where they:

  • Invest in people as a path to more inclusion
  • Recast the role of business leadership beyond politics
  • Serve others/the common good
  • Avoid failure, reasons why not, and the lure of the dark side when things get tough
  • Know the line between hero and martyr
  • Create the next generation of hero leaders

102. The Mom Test by Rob Fitzpatrick

The Mom Test is a quick, practical guide that will save you time, money, and heartbreak.

They say you shouldn’t ask your mom whether your business is a good idea, because she loves you and will lie to you. This is technically true, but it misses the point. You shouldn’t ask anyone if your business is a good idea. It’s a bad question and everyone will lie to you at least a little . As a matter of fact, it’s not their responsibility to tell you the truth. It’s your responsibility to find it and it’s worth doing right .

Talking to customers is one of the foundational skills of both Customer Development and Lean Startup. We all know we’re supposed to do it, but nobody seems willing to admit that it’s easy to screw up and hard to do right. This book is going to show you how customer conversations go wrong and how you can do better.

103. The Obstacle is the Way by Ryan Holiday

The Obstacle is the Way has become a cult classic, beloved by men and women around the world who apply its wisdom to become more successful at whatever they do.

Its many fans include a former governor and movie star (Arnold Schwarzenegger), a hip hop icon (LL Cool J), an Irish tennis pro (James McGee), an NBC sportscaster (Michele Tafoya), and the coaches and players of winning teams like the New England Patriots, Seattle Seahawks, Chicago Cubs, and University of Texas men’s basketball team.

The book draws its inspiration from stoicism, the ancient Greek philosophy of enduring pain or adversity with perseverance and resilience. Stoics focus on the things they can control, let go of everything else, and turn every new obstacle into an opportunity to get better, stronger, tougher. As Marcus Aurelius put it nearly 2000 years ago: “The impediment to action advances action. What stands in the way becomes the way.” 

Ryan Holiday shows us how some of the most successful people in history—from John D. Rockefeller to Amelia Earhart to Ulysses S. Grant to Steve Jobs—have applied stoicism to overcome difficult or even impossible situations. Their embrace of these principles ultimately mattered more than their natural intelligence, talents, or luck.

If you’re feeling frustrated, demoralized, or stuck in a rut, this book can help you turn your problems into your biggest advantages. And along the way it will inspire you with dozens of true stories of the greats from every age and era.

104. The Power of Broke by Daymond John

Daymond John has been practicing the power of broke ever since he started selling his home-sewn t-shirts on the streets of Queens. With a $40 budget, Daymond had to strategize out-of-the-box ways to promote his products. Luckily, desperation breeds innovation, and so he hatched an idea for a creative campaign that eventually launched the FUBU brand into a $6 billion dollar global phenomenon.  But it might not have happened if he hadn’t started out broke – with nothing but hope and a ferocious drive to succeed by any means possible.

Here, the FUBU founder and star of ABC’s Shark Tank shows that, far from being a liability, broke can actually be your greatest competitive advantage as an entrepreneur. Why?  Because starting a business from broke forces you to think more creatively.  It forces you to use your resources more efficiently. It forces you to connect with your customers more authentically, and market your ideas more imaginatively. It forces you to be true to yourself, stay laser focused on your goals, and come up with those innovative solutions required to make a meaningful mark. 

Drawing his own experiences as an entrepreneur and branding consultant, peeks behind-the scenes from the set of Shark Tank, and stories of dozens of other entrepreneurs who have hustled their way to wealth, John shows how we can all leverage the power of broke to phenomenal success. You’ll meet:

  • Steve Aoki, the electronic dance music (EDM) deejay who managed to parlay a series of $100 gigs into becoming a global superstar who has redefined the music industry
  • Gigi Butler, a cleaning lady from Nashville who built cupcake empire on the back of a family  recipe, her maxed out credit cards, and a heaping dose of faith
  • 11-year old Shark Tank guest Mo Bridges who stitched together a winning clothing line with just his grandma’s sewing machine, a stash of loose fabric, and his unique sartorial flair

When your back is up against the wall, your bank account is empty, and creativity and passion are the only resources you can afford, success is your only option. Here you’ll learn how to tap into that Power of Broke to scrape, hustle, and dream your way to the top.

105. What I Learned Losing a Million Dollars by Jim Paul

Jim Paul’s meteoric rise took him from a small town in Northern Kentucky to governor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, yet he lost it all — his fortune, his reputation, and his job — in one fatal attack of excessive economic hubris. In this honest, frank analysis, Paul and Brendan Moynihan revisit the events that led to Paul’s disastrous decision and examine the psychological factors behind bad financial practices in several economic sectors.

This book — winner of a 2014 Axiom Business Book award gold medal — begins with the unbroken string of successes that helped Paul achieve a jet-setting lifestyle and land a key spot with the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. It then describes the circumstances leading up to Paul’s $1.6 million loss and the essential lessons he learned from it — primarily that, although there are as many ways to make money in the markets as there are people participating in them, all losses come from the same few sources.

Investors lose money in the markets either because of errors in their analysis or because of psychological barriers preventing the application of analysis. While all analytical methods have some validity and make allowances for instances in which they do not work, psychological factors can keep an investor in a losing position, causing him to abandon one method for another in order to rationalize the decisions already made. Paul and Moynihan’s cautionary tale includes strategies for avoiding loss tied to a simple framework for understanding, accepting, and dodging the dangers of investing, trading, and speculating.

106. The Hard Thing About Hard Things by Ben Horowitz

Ben Horowitz, cofounder of Andreessen Horowitz and one of Silicon Valley’s most respected and experienced entrepreneurs, offers essential advice on building and running a startup—practical wisdom for managing the toughest problems business school doesn’t cover, based on his popular ben’s blog.

While many people talk about how great it is to start a business, very few are honest about how difficult it is to run one. Ben Horowitz analyzes the problems that confront leaders every day, sharing the insights he’s gained developing, managing, selling, buying, investing in, and supervising technology companies. A lifelong rap fanatic, he amplifies business lessons with lyrics from his favorite songs, telling it straight about everything from firing friends to poaching competitors, cultivating and sustaining a CEO mentality to knowing the right time to cash in.

Filled with his trademark humor and straight talk, The Hard Thing About Hard Things is invaluable for veteran entrepreneurs as well as those aspiring to their own new ventures, drawing from Horowitz’s personal and often humbling experiences.

107. Unleash Your Inner Company by John Chisholm

Unleash Your Inner Company distills John Chisholm’s four decades of successful entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley into ten steps to discover, launch, and scale the ideal business for you. You will learn how to:

  • Mobilize your passions and perseverance to reinforce each other and achieve your goals
  • Discover unsatisfied human and customer needs in those areas where you have natural advantages
  • Match those needs with your resources and strengths (your “STARS”) to assess which needs fit you best
  • Improve those fits by acquiring and developing the right resources and strengths; differentiate yourself by being not better, but different, from competitors, even well-established ones
  • Innovate by combining things you already know in novel ways
  • Partner with firms and individuals so you and your business can focus on what you do best
  • Evaluate your options and choose the best one for you
  • Launch and scale up your successful business, uniquely tailored to you and your strengths.

Along the way, you will discover:

  • That you have many more resources and advantages for success than you realize
  • How and when to choose a co-founder and team members
  • How to avoid competitors, and thus gain time and space to get established
  • How to find, nurture, and ride positive feedback loops within yourself, with your team members, and among your customers
  • How to build and maintain your self-confidence despite setbacks
  • If, when, and how to raise money
  • How to evolve and scale your business, no matter how modest, into a large enterprise, if you so desire
  • When to comply with, or circumvent, or oppose regulations that impede the formation or growth of your business
  • What you can learn from Apple, Google, Facebook, and Uber.

You will learn from the author’s mistakes—as many as he was able to squeeze into the 400 pages of this book—so you don’t make the same ones.

Regardless of your background, location, interests, and passions, the timeless and universal insights, principles, anecdotes, and exercises of Unleash Your Inner Company will inspire and guide you from your first steps, through every kind of obstacle, to the ultimate success of your venture.

108. Small Town Big Money by Colby Williams

Forget moving to the city to launch the next big thing only to become another face lost in the shuffle. Entrepreneurs everywhere are finally waking up to the fact that there is a better way. Small towns are ripe for entrepreneurship! Whether your goal is to start a business in the hopes of financial freedom, to gain a competitive advantage by cutting costs, or simply to make your small town better, Small Town Big Money shows you how.

Discover the untapped treasures of small town entrepreneurship, like:

  • How building your startup in a small town will launch you past your competition
  • How Colby and other small town entrepreneurs used small town stereotypes to their advantage
  • How to scale to the Big Money level, even from a small town
  • How other small town entrepreneurs built a rich life by embracing authenticity and other non-corporate values
  • How to alter your town’s paradigm in order to attract entrepreneurs and to boost your local economy

Small Town Big Money guides readers through this journey in three ways:

  1. Discover why entrepreneurs are moving to small towns.
  2. Find out how small town entrepreneurs build brands that compete on a global scale.
  3. Learn what civic leaders are doing to build small towns that entrepreneurs want to call home. With humor and practical insight, Colby gives readers a peak under the hood of the small town entrepreneur life. Small Town Big Money must be the next book about business you read.

109. Entrepreneurial Leap by Gino Wickman

You’ve thought about starting your own business . . . but how can you decide if you should really take the leap?

There’s a lot on the line, and you have to ask yourself difficult questions: Do I have what it takes? Is it worth it? And how the hell do I do it?

You need answers, not bullshit. This book has them.

Entrepreneurial Leap: Do You Have What it Takes to Become an Entrepreneur? is an easy-to-use guide that will help you decide, once and for all, if entrepreneurship is right for you—because success as an entrepreneur depends on far more than just a great idea and a generous helping of luck.

In this three-part book, Gino Wickman, bestselling author of Traction, reveals the six essential traits that every entrepreneur needs in order to succeed, based on real-world startups that have reached incredible heights. If these traits ring true for you, you’ll get a glimpse of what your life would look like as an entrepreneur. What’s more, Wickman will help you determine what type of business best suits your unique skill set and provide a detailed roadmap, with tools, tips, and exercises, that will accelerate your path to startup success.

Packed with real-life stories and practical advice, Entrepreneurial Leap is a simple how-to manual for BIG results.

Should you take the leap toward entrepreneurship? Find out today and let tomorrow be the first step in your new journey, whatever shape it may take.

110. Innovation on Tap by Eric B. Schultz

Innovation on Tap is the story of 300 years of innovation in America told through the eyes of 25 entrepreneurs–living and departed–who have gathered to “talk shop” in an imaginary barroom under the watchful eye of economist-turned-bouncer, Joseph Schumpeter. From Eli Whitney and his cotton gin to the Broadway smash, Hamilton, their stories capture the essential themes of entrepreneurship, highlight the rules for success, and celebrate the expansive sweep of innovations that have transformed our world.

111. Discover The Entrepreneur Within by Verinder K Syal

You have a lot of ideas, but where to start? One can get overwhelmed by all the steps needed to create, and launch, a successful business. Who should you turn to?

“Discover The Entrepreneur Within” is the answer to your prayers.

The workbook is based on Verinder Syal’s award-winning classes at Northwestern University, will demystify this process. He has created a step-by-step guide that gives you the tools to launch your business.

You will LEARN HOW TO: Find new Ideas and select the best one; Assemble and lead a Team; Focus on the right Customers; Market and Sell; develop a Business Model; Figure out how much money you will need and how to raise it; Develop your Pitch and make winning Presentations; to name just a few things.

In addition, there is a section that will help you examine your Values and Principles and determine the Life you want to Live.

Are you ready for a personal revolution, to achieve freedom, to do what you love, and to do so on your own terms? Do you want to help others while living a life of meaning and significance?

Let’s get started now!

112. The Purpose Is Profit by Ed “Skip” McLaughlin

Do you feel the pull to start your own business?

Tired of working for others and dealing with office politics, eager for control and more money, Ed ”Skip” McLaughlin certainly felt it. When he left his high-level corporate position to start not one but two new businesses, his colleagues’ reaction was disbelief:

People told me I was crazy. ”You are going to fail!”

One of his businesses did fail, but the other thrived. Ed bootstrapped it into an Inc. 500 company and later sold it to a Fortune 100 company. Now, you can learn from his experience–what to do and what not to do–to create your own successful startup. The Purpose Is Profit eliminates the mystery of becoming an entrepreneur. You will learn–

– Why distinctive competence trumps passion

– Where and when to get funding without losing control

– How to build an entrepreneurial brand that lasts

– Why profit should be factored into every business decision

– How ethical behavior breeds trust and unlocks profit

As a bonus, The Purpose Is Profit includes two manuals: The Startup Roadmap details the 21 steps you should take to build a profitable business. The Startup Funding Guide delivers the tools you need to fund your business.

ThePurposeIsProfit.com

113. Startup Myths and Models by Rizwan Virk

Budding entrepreneurs face a challenging road. The path is not made any easier by all the clichés they hear about how to make a startup succeed―from platitudes and conventional wisdom to downright contradictions.

This witty and wise guide to the dilemmas of entrepreneurship debunks widespread misconceptions about how the world of startups works and offers hard-earned advice for every step of the journey. Instead of startup myths―legends spun from a fantasy version of Silicon Valley―Rizwan Virk provides startup models―frameworks that help make thoughtful decisions about starting, growing, managing, and selling a business. Rather than dispensing simplistic rules, he mentors readers in the development of a mental toolkit for approaching challenges based on how startup markets evolve in real life.

In snappy prose with savvy pop-culture and real-world examples, Virk recasts entrepreneurship as a grand adventure. He points out the pitfalls that appear along the way and offers insights into how to avoid them, sharing the secrets of founding a startup, raising money, hiring and firing, when to enter a market and when to exit, and how to value a company.

Virk combines lessons learned the hard way during his twenty-five years of founding, investing in, and advising startups with reflections from well-known venture capitalists and experts. His candid advice makes Startup Myths and Models an ideal guide for those readers just embarking on the startup life and those looking for their next adventure.

114. Africa Rise And Shine by Jim Ovia

“The road to success is rarely linear and never easy. Despite countless setbacks, Jim Ovia, founder of Zenith Bank, was able to achieve the unthinkable. Africa Rise and Shine is the story of Ovia’s business and banking success and how he was able to create one of Africa’s largest banks. Spanning decades of both world and Nigerian history, Africa Rise and Shine dives deep into the events that led to Ovia’s triumph. 

Drawing upon his educational experiences and relentless determination, Ovia was able to overcome every hurdle that stood in the way of his bank becoming the national icon that it is today. Africa Rise and Shine outlines the tough, yet necessary business decisions that were essential to Zenith’s prolonged success and is filled with valuable takeaways for every businessperson. Learn from one of the best in banking what it takes to truly be successful.”

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